Best circular saw? An evaluation

By Popular Mechanics
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/power-tools/11-circular-saw-comparison-test?click=pm_news#fbIndex1
Everyone they tested had some good points.
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HeyBub wrote:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/power-tools/11-circular-saw-comparison-test?click=pm_news#fbIndex1
I like my Black and Decker. Must be too good to test.
--
LSMFT

Simple job, assist the assistant of the physicist.
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They didn't test anything but sidewinders. After years of putting up with all of the hassles of that type I got a honest to god Skill mag 77 and put the DeWalt up on the shelf. The difference is like night and day with a worm drive saw. Bosch owns Skill now, so if you want a different color, buy their version and for more money you get a replaceable cord with Twistlock plugs. Either one has more power, and cuts a much straighter line because you can actually see what the blade is doing. Even has a hook for hanging on a rafter. Makita has a hypoid drive to put he motor in line with the blade and their saw also gets high praise. The Skilsaw design has been in production for over 60 years with few changes and the only disadvantage of note is a modestly higher weight. IMO, $50 more is a small price to pay for far better and easier operation.
Joe
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re: "Either one has more power, and cuts a much straighter line because you can actually see what the blade is doing."
That's why I love my Porter-Cable (corded) saw - the blade is on the left so I can see the cut line.
I bought a Dewalt cordless because I already had the 18V batteries from my drill and radio.
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 09:52:20 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

My friend has a 'left handed' saw. Every time I have used it I felt out of place, like I was in the wrong position or something. We joke about it. He was in a hurry, needed a saw, so he bought the only one on the shelf ( a nice Milwaukee left handed saw).
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I was helping a friend build his house. One of his other friends is a framer by trade. It was the framer that suggested I try his left blade saw and once I did, I never looked back. Now I feel like I'm in the "wrong position or something" when I'm forced to use a right-blade saw.
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What is the advantage of a worm drive over direct drive? Worm drives do not last forever so there must be another advantage. Is it reduced blade speed and more torque?
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On Tue, 16 Nov 2010 16:06:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

I bought a "used once" Bosch worm drive. Only thing I did not get from the seller was the original box. It cost $100. At the time they were $170 plus tax. But you got the box. (Selling because of illness)
I love the saw. It is really for the guy that makes a living as a framer. For me as a DIYer, well I never need another saw - I think.
The cord is not a twist lock, but a snap-in the inserts at the connector. The cord is 25' long, has a light so you know you have power. The cord is easy to manage as far as wrapping it and then using it again. It also makes for a good extension cord when a short one will do.
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For me, I like the mass of the M77 saw. It is proportioned so that your hand is pushing at a lower level, and I have had far fewer kicks. I like it that you can see the blade so easily. The angle adjustment has some metal in it, and is not as flimsy as most. When you want to put a piece on your knee and cut it, you are in the perfect position to look at the cut line, line it up, and when you cut, you just about let the saw fall through the wood because of its mass. Not so with smaller lighter wimpier saws.
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On Wed, 17 Nov 2010 08:32:08 -0800, "Steve B"

The Skill Mag 77 is the mostly seen saw at construction sites (around here). I've read reviews, people that used them daily for a living. When trying to put more beans on the plate -- buy that saw.
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They didn't even test a Festool. ;-)
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On Nov 15, 11:19pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I switched to a makita last time because it had a cast plate instead of stamped steel. I agree about the worm gear ones but they are just too expensive for my taste. I have a portable stand mounted dewalt sliding coumpound miter for big jobs. I only use the the handheld circular for odds and ends. If I have to cut a lot of boards I get out the compound miter.
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wrote:

I have a stable of saws, which one gets used varies by the size of the job, the need for accuracy, and my mood. ;-) A couple of years ago bought a Dewalt "rear pivot" circular saw (DW364). It's very nice for dimensional lumber. OTOH, you can't beat a Festool for sheet goods.
I just replaced a HF SCMS with a Bosch. I'll probably use the HF outside when I replace/move a fence this spring. If it gets wet, so what?
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"HeyBub" wrote in message
By Popular Mechanics
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home/reviews/power-tools/11-circular-saw-comparison-test?click=pm_news#fbIndex1
Everyone they tested had some good points.
----------
I have an older version of the 5007 Makita 15 amp. Built right here in Canada still. I agree with the article on the handle size too small but's quiet, quick, powerful and the shoe is easy to change and leverage are big and quick to lock and adjust.
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