Basement slab weeping/leaking through bottom plate screw holes

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wrote:

You are clueless. Of course a new home *could* have water problems, but your existing house *DOES*. No, it's not worth risking major remodeling on a known problem.

You assume a lot.

Not as *stupid* as you, Haliburton.

That's that the thread is about, idiot.

I wouldn't, particularly one with a leaking basement where the water table is *known* to be too high.

You're as stupid as a stone. Your name fits well.
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if you have a reputable water proofing company do the job, wait 6 months or a year to make certain all is well and remodel.....
well lets assume you have a water problem after that. thats what homeowners insurance is for make certain it covers water inflatration.
if you then get water damage make a claim with your homeowners insurance and they will take care of it and duke it out with the waterproofing company.
theres very little for the homeowner to do to with basement waterproofing, hire a good company and sign the check when they are done, many will move the stuff in your basement for free to get the job.......
they should be expersts and know what to do if something wierd comes up.
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wrote:

...and if it was the first time in ten years the basement flooded?

Does yours? Homeowners insurance doesn't cover "rising water". Flood insurance is required. More reasons to move.

You're clueless.

You missed the part about waiting for the next flood.

Sure they do; take more money.
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On Jul 5, 11:36 am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

well a brand new home is a complete unknown, 5 years after buying it could devlop a wet basemnent problem.
insurance will add coverage for near anything, for a few bucks extra.
obviously your posting in the bwrong group this s home repair not buy a new home when anything breaks.
PLONK!
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wrote:

You do know that the new home has proper footing drainage, something you don't know with your inside hack job. You also know that the new home has an unbroken slab, with proper sub-slab drainage.

Bullshit.
You're absolutely clueless. ...but I'm not breaking the news to anyone here.

Don't run away mad, moron.
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wrote:

with a new home even with a properly installed drain system something can get blocked, like a drain line filling with silt, i dug it up and saw that first hand
water flow in area may change. this happened to a buddy who suddenly had a wet lawn and water in basement, where none had existed before. 3 years later the water line leak 1/2 mile away must of got worse, anyhow after that was fixed his yard and basement got dry again........
nothing in life is for sure except in your world you must be rich to replace anything that breaks
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wrote:

Ah, so the liar did come back.
Can, maybe, and if, don't trump *DID*.

You really are as stupid as you sound.
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I see this poster acts !$#@$$^ wherever he or she goes. has bad attitude and personal attacks on all sorts of sites.
google should delete him
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On Jul 4, 11:16 am, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

lol, clearly insane (and apt to talk about something he has zero experience with). Pointless to continue...
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: (snip)

As we have discussed on here before, drains belong OUTSIDE the wall. Sometimes an interior drain system may be the only practical alternative, but OP should look at all the usual suspects and cheap cures first. Yard grading, gutters, etc. From OP's description, this sounds like surface water getting under the slab, unless the water table fluctuates a lot in his area. Need to figure out where the water is coming in before doing anything.
OP, do you have a sump pit? Does it always have water in it? Is the leak on same end of basement? Another sump pit may be called for. Do you know if you have footer-level foundation drains, and where they drain to? If the drain point is accessible, they may need to be cleaned. Any sign of seepage or white crystals or mold growing on the walls? If walls are dry and clean, I suspect water is coming down outside the walls, and leaking in at footer level.
Here, in five years, my sump pit has stayed bone dry. Fixing outside grading in a few spots, and disabling the pipes idiot previous owner installed to direct downspout water straight down around the foundation, solved 98% of my problem of damp spots in corners. Even with failed sealing on outside of foundation, and failed foundation drains (if they were ever there) a little more landscaping and some epoxy injected into one rusted-out form tie hole, would dry me out completely. And my water table is only a couple feet below slab level.
--
aem sends...

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wrote:

But still below the footings. A perimeter drain 18" below grade will do a little good-- but an interior perimeter drain will do more.
Jim
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An interior drain system is a huge job. I would not go there because 1 time he had some moisture where he penetrated the slab.
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If water came up through holes in the slab, then best case he's going to have damp and mold issues. I wouldn't be finishing the basement without getting that checked out at least. In an unfinished basement it need not be a huge job.
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If his problem is the water table then cutting into the slab is only going to make it worse. There is no certainty with anything but I'd start simple and watch it for a while.
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cutting into slab adding french drain and wall drains with sump pump will definetely fix the moisture problem forever....far cheaper than the other way............
exterior drains sound great but are costly. execavate all the way around your home, losing all plantings landscaping sidewalks patios etc AC compressor may be in way cut down a tree or two to get bachoe in back yard. have to dig BELOW footer level and even then a high water table directly under your home you can still get water in your basement. any paved areas must only be backfilled with gravel to pavement level or pavement may tip or move, and even if you do it perfect it may move anyway:(
scrub exterior walls super clean and paint with water proofingn and add drainage membrame/
dig a ditch to daylight somewhere, hopefully your home isnt the low spot of the neighborhood.
now regrade lawn the backhoe has things torn up and rutted, might as well replace the gas line the backhoe bumped while digging, new downspout underground drain lines too. now plant and water grass.........
home finally looks nice, county asseor noticed and raised homes value...and you needed building permit. nosey inspectors came visiting, is so and so up to code?
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Well said.
OP needs to get the experts in now.
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Can't help you with #1. You might find someone via this newsgroup but it's doubtful.
I agree with some of the other posters about looking ourtside first. Make sure that you have done everything you can to get the water away from the house. Extend the gutter drains a minimum of 10'. Correct any grading so you have lengthy slopes away form the house. If all that is already in place then the concenr would be that the water table is simply coming up under your basement floor. Have you ever had any water problems before? How long have you been in this house? Do you believe you drilled through the slab?
I agree about epoxy verses other solutions. It's a difficult choice. I know nothing adheres like epoxy and it is the most likely to remain adhered over the other options. But as you pointed out you will have to cut the tapcons off to remove them. If this is where the wall sare going to stay then maybe that is not an issue. The trouble with other solutions is that if they loose adherence to the concrete or tapcons some years down the road it will be difficult to redo them. I'd probably go epoxy. But I am an epoxy bigot :-)
You said this happened after a week of heavy rains. If this is as bad as it gets and you have never had water problems before then maybe this isn't a big deal. The pt is the right thing to connect to. I'm wondering if maybe you should use pt as the bottom plate on your wall as well so you have two layers. I would definately keep the insulation above the bottom. What wall coverings were you considering? Leave a healthy gap and prime the backside of the molding.
What's your schedule? Can you seal the holes and then take a break for a few months to see what happens?
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since water has been a issue even once its far better to do it once do it right then relax and enjoy your new room knowing it wouldnt have a water issue someday. DEFINTELY USE pressure treated wood for the bottom plate.
since no one knows for sure if the water table in the area is high, the french drain protects from all that with the gutter and weep holes at the bottom of al, exterior walls.
it might be 5 years till the 100 year storm floods his basement, so waiting isnt a reliable option.....
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Bryan,
How long have you lived in the house? I'm in Eagan and had some water in the basement last week for the first time in five years or so. I've been fighting the moisture thing for the last 25 years with reasonable success. It was really bad when we first moved in.
I find it hard to believe the Tapcons punctured the vapor barrier under your slab, unless they were over six inches long. Depending on the age of your house you may not have a barrier there. Were you in the house during our last 700 year flood (10 or 12 years ago?). My guess is you've always had a moisture problem, you just didn't have enough moisture to experience it.
Good luck.
dss
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Do you have a drain tile and sump pump? I think you need one. I have used these guys in two homes for drain tiles, and one of my friends used them also on my recommendation. In my experience they are the best in the TC's. I would highly recommend. They are experts and will advise you exactly what you need. When I did my first house I had about 8 companies come out, and heard different suggestions from all of them and none of them seemed to really know what was going on. These guys identified the problem exactly and explained it to me clearly. It seems there are a lot of fly by nights in this market that don't really understand the finer points, but these guys at standard are proper experts with many years' experience. Can't hurt to get them out to have a look. Honestly, I have no affiliation with them.
http://standardwater.com /
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