Bad tires---front or back

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Actually, an evenly worn tire that still has adequate tread often has better traction than a brand new tire.
--
Make it as simple as possible, but no simpler.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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On 9/3/2010 5:17 AM, Larry W wrote:

Yes that is true, on a dry road with no possibility of hydroplaning.
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Bad tires go to the recycling place.
Best tires go on the back, Good or better tires on the front.
I see many answer to put the good tires on the front. That was the common method for many years, but now it is proved that the better tires should go on the rear. I cannot recall where I saw it, but a web site has a video showing why and it does make sense.
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That's what I would think, too. The back end had better stay back there. OTOH, a blowout in the front can ruin your day, too. Modern tires don't tend to self-destruct that way, though.
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On 9/2/2010 8:20 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Stuff That Can Kill You, is not the place to cut corners. Even if i have to postpone buying something else, I won't skimp on tires or brakes. Engine dying is a PITA, but unlikely to kill you (other than in the middle of a left turn, of course.) I've had a blowout at speed- thankfully on the rear- and it was not fun. I've had brakes crap out without warning- thankfully at low speed, and the handbrake still worked- but again, not fun.
--
aem sends...

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No argument. Some don't have the sense they were born with, though.

I've never had a catastrophic blowout. I just had a rear tire go flat quickly at highway speed (hit something in the road) but it wasn't an instantaneous thing. It wasn't a sudden failure, however. I knew what was happening by the time it was flat.
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wrote:

== A blow-out at 110 MPH can still be quite jolting when it happens...especially so with a front tire. I have had them run right off the rim...not for the faint of heart while driving in the mountains. ==
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Roy wrote:

Then there's this.
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1040509/racecar_tire_amazingly_reattaches_itself_after_falling_off/
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On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 19:20:27 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Oh? What happens when you hit trash on the road and it slices the sidewall?? One of the most common causes of sudden tire failure - and it USUALLY affects the front tires. Also, radial tires are not terribly forgiving of curb scuffs to the sidewall - which can cause premature failure of the sidewall, and again affect the front wheels more than the rear. Granted, these situations are no respector of tread depth, but the new tire is most likely to be in better condition, structually, than the old tire. I will continue to keep the best tires on the front of my front wheel drive vehicles, and drive sanely in adverse conditions.
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On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 21:02:39 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

"Self-destruct"
They rarely, if ever, suddenly explode. Even with major damage they tend to go flat gracefully (i.e. don't just dissappear).

Suit yourself, but you're wrong.
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snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

I experienced a rear tire blowout as a kid. Pretty wild ride - off the highway, over a barbed wiree fence. Both bumpers folder back 90 degrees on the right end. I'm not sure I'd recommend it.
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wrote:

Have you suffered and survived a front wheel blowout???
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Living in snow country, and driving rear wheel drive. I put the newer tires on back for traction.
Last year, I had a tire blow out. The left rear tire of my van picked up a nail. The first I knew anything was wrong, the van wasn't handling right. I pulled over. Find out that the sidewall on both sides had sheared. The rim had a little rubber on it, and there was a peel that resembled a tire, wrapped around the hub.
It was a Walmart tire, with warranty. I got a flatbed ride home. The next day, I pulled the tire, and took it to another Walmart. $2.50 later, I had a new tire mounted and balanced. Just used up about five hours or six, between the two days. Blow out, wait for tire guy, wait for tow truck, jacking up the van, going to the store, wait for the tire to be mounted, and replacing tire and all that.
--
Christopher A. Young
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wrote:

And the fact he was able to drive it untill it was that bad before noticing proves the rear tire is not nearly as important for stability as many on the list believe. If it had been the front tire, he'd have known about it a lot sooner - and had a lot more "fun" controlling it.
Not as bad on new cars with negative scrub radius as it was on the older stuff - but still not a walk in the park (unless that's where the car deposits you when the tire fails)
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On Sep 3, 2:41pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

re: "And the fact he was able to drive it untill it was that bad before noticing proves the rear tire is not nearly as important for stability as many on the list believe".
Apples and oranges.
Stability while driving with a flat and the propensity of a tire to skid or hydroplane due to worn tread are 2 very different things.
The fact he was able to drive it until it was that bad before noticing proves only that the driver wasn't in tune with his vehicle.
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On Fri, 3 Sep 2010 12:09:29 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

You have obviously never been involved in performance driving of any sort, nor do you have any REAL knowlege of handling - what it is, and what affects it.
You are also, it seems, one of the many that will believe anything a tire salesman tells you.
You likely believe used car salesmen as well.
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wrote:

On many vehicles, you could almost loose one rear tire and not notice it on a straight road. As they slowly go flat you will feel and hear something out of the ordinary -but perhaps with the radio on you could miss it completely untill the tire was totally flat. With no load, at speed, a non-driving rear tire can stay round with very little air pressure.
Not so on the front, particularly when front engine, front drive.
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wrote:

Note, I said "on a straight road". You could have a totally flat tire on the rear of many vehicles and not notice it untill you had to turn.
That CANNOT happen with a bad tire on the front.
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wrote:

My long weekend trip this weekend included, both ways, a stretch of road some 45 miles without a 5 degree turn to left or right - all on paved roads. That's 90 miles in 2 segments - and several stretches of 15 miles or more in a straight line as well.
LOTS of places you can drive 25 miles in a straight line within Ontario - Get into manitoba and Saskachewan, and there are stretches of over 100 miles at a time where you are driving virtually straight.
And all it takes is a couple of miles with substantually reduced tire pressure to totally destroy a tire -
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On Sep 3, 4:26pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What is the advantage to the tire salesman (and every other tire related source that I can find) to tell people to put the best tires on the rear? I'm not talking about salesmen that refuse to sell you 2. I'm talking about tire dealers ranging from local shops, to major manufacturers, to the on-line dealers that will happily sell you 2 tires and recommend that they go on the rear.
Goodyear, Michelin, Dunlop, Firestone, etc. Sure, they would prefer that you buy 4, but even they say that if you are going to replace 2, put the new ones on the rear.
What about sources like Popular Mechanics, MSN-Auto, numerous auto forums and law websites that cite accident studies, etc. - Sources that make no money on tire sales and have no incentive to have you buy 4 tires - or any tires at all for that matter.
Do they all have ulterior motives or are they all just flat out wrong?
It's also curious that all sites related to drifting say the best tires go on the front...so that the back end can skid. Not exactly what you want to happen with a passenger vehicle.
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