Bad tires---front or back

Page 2 of 7  

On Mon, 06 Sep 2010 20:37:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sure, snow is more predictable than water. You can see it and you know it's slippery (and when it isn't, no harm). Ice, OTOH, can be a real bitch, particularly the stuff you can't see (black ice), so don't expect. I've been in situations when suddenly I realized that I couldn't see (the reflections of) my headlights. The heart races and the balls find refuge. Classic "Oh Shit!".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 06 Sep 2010 23:44:47 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

I've been driving in that crap since 1968, with a short reprieve of 2 winters spent in central Africa - where loose sand on the road can be just as bad - and for 3 months of the year hydroplaning can be a very real problem - as can slippery climy MUD.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 07 Sep 2010 13:07:44 -0400, clare wrote:

For sure. I drove home last night on a lot of unpaved roads during a really heavy rainstorm - driving on that lot was very like driving on snow. Mixture of slippery clay stuff and sand. Good practice for the six months of white stuff we tend to get up here, though! :-)
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 07 Sep 2010 13:07:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Except for the last two years (moved to Alabama in '08), I've driven in snow since I got my licence ('67) too. It's funny here. They canceled work on a prediction of snow. I showed up because I didn't bother to check the web site since there was no snow (it did start in the late afternoon).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 2 Sep 2010 16:03:01 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Having driven competetively I'd have to dissagree. But the BEST is to have all 4 tires up to snuff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 02 Sep 2010 20:47:56 -0400, clare wrote:

Yes, I think it very much depends on the vehicle (FWD or RWD, manual or slushbox, weight distribution etc.) and the road conditions. A couple of my RWD cars showed a lot of natural oversteer, but were quite controllable whenever the back end did decide to get out of line - for those I think I would have put as much grip as I could get on the front rather than the back.

Or five if you're carrying a spare ;)
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jules Richardson wrote:

Driving home at night a couple of weeks ago, I heard a slight thump.
Looking in the rear view mirror I saw a black lump under the street light in the middle of my lane. Curious, and not being in a hurry, I did a U-turn to investigate.
IT WAS MY SPARE TIRE! which has been stored under the bed of my pickup.
I retrieved the tire and sorted through the detritus on the roadway capturing anything that looked like it may be related.
Turns out, the cable holding the tire in place broke.
But, following your advice and not being curious and not just moseying along, I could have lost a GOOD tire.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The spare mounting hardware is so rusted on my truck it'll never come off. A garage tried a few weeks ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've lost 4 spares over the years on Toyota, Ford Aerostars, and Pontiac TranSport
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 03 Sep 2010 12:55:35 -0700, keith wrote:

I'm not sure where I gave that advice... [I know you didn't type that, keith - just condensing two replies into one!]

Mine's mounted vertically on the side of the load-bed.
cheers
Jules
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 3 Sep 2010 20:35:21 +0000 (UTC), Jules Richardson

Mine's under the bed; hanging for seven years in VT salt. It's now nine years-old, but it's never been off the truck.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sep 3, 11:38pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

== You'll be lucky if there is a rim left. Salt is a bitch. Why manufacturers put spares where they do is a mystery that has never been solved. Idiot engineers perhaps. ==
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's easy. Under the bed is otherwise wasted space. Where else are you proposing to put one on a pickup?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2010 12:59 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Where they put them until the early 70's if you checked the right box on the order form- vertically in the bed right behind the driver (so as to not block his vision), bolted to a purpose-built bracket in the bed sidewall.
Shortly after that is when pickups started being used like cars, and customers and the marketing people said it was 'ugly' to do it that way.
That 'wasted space' under the bed could be used for a second gas tank, or a storage compartment or something.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

So you'd rather have storage where you can't get to it than that space in the bed? That's really strange.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why does it have to be where you can't get to it? How about a hatch in the bed?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/4/2010 10:41 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

He is assuming he bed will be full, and that is a valid point. But I'd rather unload the bed on the side of the road (unless it is a load of manure or something) to get to a seldom-used item, than crawl on the muddy ground. Honda did that with their sort-of-a-truck Ridgeline.
They need to go back to having truck beds designed by people that actually use them, rather than stylists. Most modern truck beds, even the so-called flare-sides with plastic fenders, have a ton of dead space in the side walls. Ford used to have special-order beds that had storage cubbies in the dead space, but being Ford, they weren't weather-sealed very well, prone to rust, and if the bed got the slightest bit racked (like from a fender-bender or accidental overloading), they were prone to jamming or refusing to latch. Dodge came out with something along the same line a couple years ago- don't know if they still offer it. Theirs were on top, though, so probably less prone to failure.
All this is why people who really need every square/cubic inch from their truck beds order chassis-cabs and fit aftermarket service beds. Some of those things are amazing, almost like a big sailboat cabin, with storage and hanging brackets for stuff all over them. I've even seen service beds with a slot under the tailgate, with a door, to hold the spare tire.
If I ever own a pickup again (not likely anytime soon), I'll rig some sort of bracket other than under the bed, to hold the spare. Even on a clean dry road, I'm too damn old and stiff to crawl on the ground. Good thing tires are a lot better than they used to be- unless you work construction or something, flats from punctures are a rare thing these days.
--
aem sends...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Amen to that! When I bought my used 1989 F150 I replaced all 4 tires with load rated radials (I cut firewood). I have BTDT retrieving a spare from under the bed in the middle of winter. Swore I wouild never ever do it again.
<snip>

An in-bed bracket is available at any parts house for a few bucks and only takes one bolt and one sheet metal screw (big) to mount.
Good

Welll...yes, for running over things but sidewall punctures can be done easier than the old non-radials - ask me how I know about that out in the boonies :(
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How is under the bed impossible to get at, yet you would use that space for storage compartments? <boggle>

Sounds like a good way to trap water (and rust the crap out of the bed).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They make it work for submarines. It is al in the design.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.