Auto Brake Wear for 2003 Forester Subaru

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Well, that's why your brakes are wearing out prematurely: you're not downshifting the transmission on the downgrades. Again, obsessing over the difference between 40K on the OEM pads, and 20K on the replacements, misses the point: your brakes are wearing out faster than they should, because you're using them too much.
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You could try rec.autos.tech.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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he's already found alt.autos.subaru
it seems a fairly busy group.
s

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On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 10:53:31 -0400, "Don Phillipson"
Subaru:

Or alt.autos.subaru
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watch for bad rubber brake lines, the interior of the hoses detoriate, and act like check valves, the brakes never go completely off.........
massive fast pad wear........
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W. eWatson wrote:

Hi, Using same OEM pads? Maybe caliper is sticking? On my '98 Homda CRV I logged 150K miles B4 I needed a brake job. At my dealer I had discs drums turned, flushed system, put in new pads/linings. Since almost 70K miles and nothing wrong with brakes. I do mostly freeway driving.
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On Wed, 20 Aug 2008 05:08:08 -0700, "W. eWatson"

alt.autos
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This will probably start a flaming session on this thread, but here are my thoughts.
40-60K on OEM pads is typical. However, it really depends on the vehicle. I've seen some Chrysler minivans wear out a set of OEM pads in as little as 28K. I've also seen some vehicles get 80K.
On replacement pads, it's really a matter of putting in a quality set. There are NO industry standards on what you can call a premium pad. Zip, nadda. So the cheap crap that's coming in from China is all labeled PREMIUM. It's such a huge problem that the reputable brake friction companies have started an independent testing lab to test their products. If it's B.E.E.P. or D3EA certified, it's a quality product.
When it comes to the type of friction material, you can't just go with a blanket statements that ceramics are better. Ceramics offer some advantages, longer life isn't one of them. They are really designed for quieter operation and less brake dust, as opposed to semi-metallics which offer the best heat dissapation and stopping power. Ceramic composition varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. Again, no industry standard.
Same thing with rotors. The economy rotors are the worst. You can buy a name brand Wagner or Raybestos rotor and an economy rotor for the same vehicle, and the economy rotor will weigh less, have thinner friction surfaces, and fewer cooling vanes. They don't fit on the hub as well and that can cause them to warp faster. Because they're made from cheaper metals, they can chew up a set of pad mighty fast. It's the rotors job to absorb and then dissapate heat quickly. If it's thinner right out of the box, you're compromising safety. Tests by Raybestos show greater stopping distances with economy rotors.
The other thing many shops overlook is the operation of the rear brakes. They only do 20% of the braking, but if they aren't working properly, that extra 20% on the fronts really puts them over the edge. That means properly adjusting the rears, making sure the self adjusters work, and checking the operation of the proportioning valve.
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To various posters on this thread,
This is the bottom of the big hill, Ridge and Nevada City Hwy. The top is up Ridge Road about 3/4 of a mile. When I reach the top, I then descent 200 feet down to my house. It's hilly and curvy. <http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&q=go%20to%20head%20of%20class%20board%20game&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wl So I go up a hill from around A every day, then down a 200' hill to my house. I do go the other way when I leave the house. Lots of hills, and curves. Stop by some time and I'll take you for a ride.
--
Wayne Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)

(121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
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hey, I think I pass by in the opposite direction every day. Howdy!
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