Are these wall switches still legal to use?

Are these wall switches still legal to use? They were real popular when I was a kid, and would like to put them in my house. They are the old style push buttons. See photo here.
http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixbshow3706/templates/displayer.phtml?iqg 49130a37d8e7a932c456f6a7724b8a
Paul
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paulgreer@A_L.com wrote:

http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixbshow3706/templates/displayer.phtml?iqg 49130a37d8e7a932c456f6a7724b8a
Style I don't believe is an issue. The question is are they approved for the use you intend?
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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In the US they must have a UL label to be approved

http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixbshow3706/templates/displayer.phtml?iqg 49130a37d8e7a932c456f6a7724b8a
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RBM wrote:

This is a small point but in some cases it becomes important. No AHJ can require you to use only UL listed equipment. They have to accept the listing marks of other recognized electrical testing laboratories. Some specialized and historic parts manufacturers turn to ETL and other smaller labs to keep cost down on small production runs of unique items but that does not make them unlawful to use. The applicable language from the US NEC is 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment. (A) Examination. In judging equipment, considerations such as the following shall be evaluated: (1)    Suitability for installation and use in conformity with the provisions of this Code FPN:Suitability of equipment use may be identified by a description marked on or provided with a product to identify the suitability of the product for a specific purpose, environment, or application. Suitability of equipment may be evidenced by listing or labeling. (2)    Mechanical strength and durability, including, for parts designed to enclose and protect other equipment, the adequacy of the protection thus provided (3)    Wire-bending and connection space (4)    Electrical insulation (5)    Heating effects under normal conditions of use and also under abnormal conditions likely to arise in service (6)    Arcing effects (7)    Classification by type, size, voltage, current capacity, and specific use (8)    Other factors that contribute to the practical safeguarding of persons using or likely to come in contact with the equipment"
Notice that Underwriters laboratories is not mentioned by name The reference to listing or labeling in the fine print note are not part of the code itself and are therefore not enforceable as such and the listing and labeling of one lab is a valid as any other for code enforcement purposes. -- Tom Horne -- Tom Horne
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But neglecting what local code enforcement say require:

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> But neglecting what local code enforcement say require: >
Local enforcement can only require what the law requires. The maxim of the law is that whatever is not forbidden is allowed. Unless the local inspector can quote you chapter and verse then screw your courage to the sticking point and demand a written corrective order. After there office knows you will appeal arbitrary and capricious rulings they will be far more careful about what they try to make you do. Some may be vindictive and never cut you any slack but if you are a qualified electrician that does not do shoddy work you shouldn't need any slack. Your work either complies with the code as adopted or it does not. -- Tom Horne
Well we aren't no thin blue heroes and yet we aren't no blackguards to. We're just working men and woman most remarkable like you.
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http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixbshow3706/templates/displayer.phtml?iqg 49130a37d8e7a932c456f6a7724b8a
These are UL listed. I don't see any reason why not. They do add character to the right house.
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2005 02:17:58 -0500, wrote:

http://www.rejuvenation.com/fixbshow3706/templates/displayer.phtml?iqg 49130a37d8e7a932c456f6a7724b8a The ones you remember as a kid were not sealed, and would not be legal to install today. However, the new switches you cited are essentially replicas, built to today's standards, and UL listed.
If you're willing to spend $20 for a light switch, knock yourself out! ;-)
--
Seth Goodman

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On Sun, 15 May 2005 02:17:58 -0500, paulgreer@A_L.com wrote:

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On Sun, 15 May 2005 02:17:58 -0500, paulgreer@A_L.com wrote:

IMHO:
They advertised them as UL listed, and I'm guessing that if you follow the manufacture's instructions and the switches limitations (120v15a as listed) it should be ok.
btw, they look interesting, very unique.
later,
tom @ www.WorkAtHomePlans.com
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