Are Storm Windows a reasonable approach for newish vinyl windows?

Grandma's house had 'em. Ours is a new house (7 years old) with builder basic vinyl windows. There's one huge (6050) picture window on the north side that just sheds in soooo much cold air - it's unbelievable!!! In winter, the cold air just cascades down the thing!
Budget's very tight - and I'm rather look for some inexpensive ways to address the draftiness without looking at a replacement yet.
Put up some of that clear plastic sheeting - and it helped. But am now looking for something that might last 3 or so years.
Watched an episode of This Old House where they had new windows going in a historic house - and they had "energy panels" - essentially Storm Windows on the inside.
That got me thinking - does anyone think a storm window might be a reasonable approach on this picture window?
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The problem is FINDING a storm windo that would fit....
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Dr. Hardcrab wrote:

Why? they make them any size you want.
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Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/




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patrick conroy wrote:

You cam buy what is essentially a frame and removeable glass. They work well for windows that do not open. I've not priced them for years, but they used to be rather reasonable for what you got. The fram mounts inplace with screws, the window fits in with clips that make it easy to take out for cleaning.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/




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"> patrick conroy wrote:

What about the heat gain and sun damage especially on the SW side? I thought storm windows over vinyl was a big no-no.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

no) and fiberglass doors it is a no no. esp. on the south and sw side. if you do have one make sure it is open at the top and probably the bottom to let the heat out.
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On Sat, 29 Oct 2005 18:58:37 GMT, "Colbyt"

Just put the storm on the inside. You can buy plastic strips at ACE Hardware and probably other places, that allow you to cut them to fit your window and put plexiglass into them. The finished window that you make goes on the inside using clips screwed to the woodwork.
Or make yourself a wooden frame with plexiglass inserted into it.
Of course heavy curtains work well too, if they fit close enough to the window. The problm is that most people use rods that make them hang 6 or more inches from the glass. I have a drafty large window in my house. In winter I put heavy curtains on it, but I screw the cloth directly to the woodwork using wood screws and washers. If people dont like the looks of it, too bad, they can pay my heating bill. It looks much better than ugly plastic sheeting. In summer I leave it screwed on the top and sides but tie it back to the sides of the window. I never open this particular window, but like to see outside in summer. In winter, I could care less to see a bunch of ugly snow.
Mark
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The clear poly installed on the inside is super cheap & if you don't open the window in the summer - you can just leave it up year 'round as it will help with reduced air infiltration during the summer as well.
If installing the poly on the inside did not fully do the trick - you can install poly on the outside - although it has to be installed in warmer weather (above 50F) so the tape will stick to the window frame. I suppose you could use a hair dryer to get the tape to bond if it is too cold right now where you live. Finding exterior grade tape is much harder than the interior tape. Be sure to remove this poly and tape in the spring as the tape will bond to the window frame during the warm summer & it is then very hard to get it off.
I put a couple of small holes in the poly at the top and bottom - using a 'lit then blown-out' match to melt the holes - This allows for vapor to escape.

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