Are Permits necessary?

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Dumb question but if one wanted to buy some raw land...and build a small cabin (very small) to use as a camp of sorts.... does one need any kind of permit for that especially if the cabin will have no plumbing and no electricity and no heating cooling source?
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On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 08:04:20 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net scribbled this interesting note:

Probably depends on where said proposed cabin is. Some places probably yes, others probably no.
-- John Willis (Remove the Primes before e-mailing me)
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Not dumb at all. It would depend on the location
In my town, you need 2 acres to build anything. A permit is required at 200 square feet, even if it is a storage shed. I'm sure it would vary in other locations due to zoning laws.
You may get away building a shed, but could run into problems if you tried to inhabit it as it would not meet codes for a house.
A friend of mine built a house a few years ago. Of course he had to get a CO before moving in, but he needed space to put his belongings as his old house was old and they were living with his parents He was allowed to move in boxes of stuff, some furniture, but not beds or anything that would be deemed as having someone live there.
Ed
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What if you only wanted to live the temporarily each year?
Say 6 weeks in Jan-Feb?
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Like was said before, it depends on where you are. There are parts of america that still think this is a free country, and you can build anything you damn well want, as long as you stay away from wetlands. And there are other parts of the country where you're not allowed to replace an outlet or park an RV.
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do you want it insured?
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This gets back to my idea. Get the damned government out of the "owner/builder" permit business altogether. Let the insurance company administer it with private inspectors. They already do this with building loan "draw" inspections so the infrastructure is in place now.
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Greg wrote:

Who do you want to fine us for code violations - Allstate or State Farm? Are you in favor of tarpaper shacks? They meet the community standard in some places.
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You don't get "fined" for permitted code violations, you just get a failure card that has to be cleared before you get a certificate of compliance. If the insurance company was involved you would fix the violation before youir insurance would kick in. Folks say that is true now, where is the change?

If that is the standard, who am I to dissagree? Who are YOU? It still gets back to who is hurt and who is liable? I am talking about OWNER BUILDER, not homes for sale or work for hire. The government has made the permit process so complicated and expensive that MOST people will avoid it if they can, hence this thread. There should be a simpler way for a homeowner to get a real inspection of their work, perhaps even some guidance. You sure don't get either from most building departments. You never will when they are doing an inspection every 12 minutes, including travel time.
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The trouble is, the government can do "inspections" at a reasonable rate, because they're not liable for missing anything. If you privatise inspection and do *certification*, as a private individual, you're going to need substantial insurance coverage, highly trained inspectors, and a lot more time per house. Paying for that is almost certain to exceed the savings for doing it yourself, anyway. I don't believe there's any way to provide the kind of support you're envisioning to homeowners without creating some kind of immunity to liability.
-Goedjn
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Depends on the town. In my town, the inspector is reasonable, fair, and has offered suggestions to fix problems or keep them from happening. The inspector truly can be your friend.
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No
This would basically be a "cabin" back in the woods. No lights, running water.
Just a wooden shelter only. Heck it might even be a small wooden shed or Tuff Shed like you'd buy from Home Depot. Big enough to sleep in and keep some gear
A place to "live: for a 4 week hunting trip
Does that info help?
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So who is going to rat you out if you do? I say go for it. Your biggest chance of getting in trouble is if you build it on the nest of some endangered stink beetle or something.
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Pitch a tent. $400 or so of canvas and rope, cut the sticks on site.
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wrote:

Permits have two functions. The first is to notify the local authorities that you are performing the work so they can verify that the work meets standards adopted by the jurisdiction you're in. The second is so that authorities can verify that what you intend to do is allowed within the jurisdiction.
For example, expanding a bathroom may require that you meet certain plumbing and electrical codes. In addition, your jurisdiction may have restirctions on what you can do in your bathroom remodel. For instance, if you move a window it may hve to be a certain size or style in your area.
The drawback of not obtaining a permit is the possibility your local authority will find out, in which case there are penalties and remedies you can be required to pay or meet.
A third factor permitting in some cases is the noyification to local taxing authorities of a potential increae in the taxable value of your property due to the renovation.
Jeff
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