Arc welding question

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Hello,
I'm wondering how thick of steel, oh say 1ft x 1ft, sheet metal a 110Amp arc welder can weld? As example, lets say I wanted to make a steel box. They have one at homedept
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&productId0648191
Model AWELD110
Thanks my friends, Anon
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&productId0648191
110 amp is way plenty for your use.
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Claude Hopper :)

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On Nov 26, 3:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Your better off buying a 220 amp arcwelder. It can weld stronger.
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Ok. I'll look into them. I only have 120V lines. I don't remember seeing any 220amp units for just 120volt lines. I don't want to be popping circuit breakers.
Thanks, Anon
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

That unit you are looking requires a 220 volt outlet like a dryer.
Don't get your amps and volts mixed up.
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Claude Hopper :)

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On Nov 26, 2:02 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

re-read the specs
this is a 5400 watt unit......you cannot easily get 5000 watts out of a 120V outlet.
The specs call for 240V 40amp circuit...you'd probably be able to get by with a 30amp circuit & your dryer breaker / receptacle.
the specs are unclear but lists capacity at 2-11..... I'm guessing but .....2mm to 11mm thickness????
this unit might be a little wimpy, here's a link and a couple reviews
http://www.everygenerator.com/Buffalo-Tools-AWELD110-BUF1036.html
cheers Bob
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BobK207 wrote:

If you plan on doing any serious welding I would recommend going with a good "brand name" welder, e.g. Lincoln, Miller, etc. also look into MIGs, they are easy for beginners to use and produce nicer welds than a stick welder. only downside is that you have to buy a bottle of argon/CO2 but then again you just use mild steel wire instead of flux coated rod (win some, lose some) a 12V MIG is adequate for, say, car body sheetmetal welding although I wouldn't want to do frame work with it.
nate
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Thanks everyone for the advice. You're all right, the dryer is 220V, and 30amps. The welder spec is 220v and 40A and 5400 watts, but maybe it will still work.
What amazes me is how 120v units could produce 120amps? Here's one,
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=55060
To get 5400 watts from 120volts it would have to draw 45 amps. This one draws 42 amps. That sounds like a lot of current for a 120v socket.
Thanks, Anon
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: ...

... Output is high amps, but low voltage.
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a. you don't use them at maximum capacity and b. welders are always over rated as to the input requirements.
we have a production sized (250 A) hobart and it runs just fine on a 30 a breaker. As a matter of fact, the whole garage is 200 feet from the house and is fed off of a 30a breaker and flows through a 10 ga wire that is buried under ground. Has worked fine for over 30 years. air compressor, lights, welder, grinders, overhead heater, etc. Power requirements are always over estimated.
steve
Thanks everyone for the advice. You're all right, the dryer is 220V, and 30amps. The welder spec is 220v and 40A and 5400 watts, but maybe it will still work.
What amazes me is how 120v units could produce 120amps? Here's one,
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberU060
To get 5400 watts from 120volts it would have to draw 45 amps. This one draws 42 amps. That sounds like a lot of current for a 120v socket.
Thanks, Anon
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Steve Barker DLT wrote:

No, the power requirements are based on the rated output and duty cycle. You simply aren't pushing the welder near that maximum rated output, nor are you likely approaching the duty cycle. Your 30A breakers are most likely HACR rated and as such will allow you to draw more than 30A for a short time without tripping as well.
I have a Syncrowave 250, which wants a 100A 240V feed for it's 250A 40% duty cycle output. I ran it for some time on a 30A feed until I was able to upgrade the power to my shop. On that 30A circuit it did just fine when I was running at about 125A max output welding 16ga steel in short segments. If I tried higher current levels to weld aluminum it would trip that 30A breaker in just a few seconds.
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I have a Lincoln 175 SP+ that is 220v, and 22 amps max. What a lot of people don't consider in a one man operation is that the welder, drill press, grinder, and various tools are NOT going to be run at the same time by one person.
However, what people also do not consider is that it is VERY easy to overload a 110 circuit, weaken the breaker so it pops off at a lower than rated amperage, and then they completely ignore the fact that the 110v. welders generally have a horrible duty cycle. Particularly el cheapos. (for you newbies, that is the amount of time you can weld, and then have to let the unit rest and cool off.) They are also VERY easy to fry, and then you are back to boat anchor parameters.
Steve
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Read the specs carefully. This welder runs on 115 OR 230V and 30 TO 120 amps. That almost certainly means that you can only get 120 amps with a 230V supply. It also says that at 95 amps you only get 6% duty cycle (meaning 6% of the time you can work and 94% is spent waiting for the transformer to cool). There's probably a reason why they didn't quote a duty cycle for 120 amps... This looks like a case of getting what you pay for (and no more).
On Nov 26, 6:12 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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the smaller "migs' will use a flux core wire and no shielding gas is necessary.
steve

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Yabbut, you will have to wait for a long time for it to cool off if you learn to weld and want to lay down some serious beads. It will only be adequate for tacking or small welds.
Steve
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only downside is that you have to buy a bottle of

That's flux cored. Flux on the inside. FCAW = Flux Cored Arc Welding
Steve
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote: ...

It's not so much the input voltage as the output current that's significant. Of course, higher input voltage allows for more output current at reasonable input wiring requirements so there are lower limits on what one finds at 115VAC input vis a vis 230VAC input.
A rough rule of thumb is 125A will be able to weld about 3/16" mild steel; there are 115VAC welders that can do that at fairly low duty cycles (say 25%, maybe).
As you go down in amperage, so does the single-pass welding capacity, obviously.
Of course, w/ preparation and care and practice, one can learn to weld thicker material using multiple passes.
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Don't connect fusion and penetration with multiple passes. One good pass with a properly energized 7018 rod will hold better than six passes with a cold lapped mig multiple fillet weld.
When properly welding, "preparation, care, and practice" are substitutes for attaining the proper fusion temperatures required of the filler and base metal to make a homogeneous molten puddle that will fuse everything into a safe strong weld. Cold lap is a condition common to MIG welding, whereas it is not with stick..
Steve
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The model you cite requires 240 volts.
1/8" to 1/4" steel requires 50 to 120 amps with 1/8" electrode (according to "Modern Welding" by Althouse, et al.) The dimensions of the sheets are largely irrelevant.
If you haven't welded before, prepare for a good deal of practicing. It might be cheaper to have a welding or machine shop fabricate it for you.
You'll also have to buy a helmet, electrodes and perhaps other accessories.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&langId=-1&catalogId053&productId0648191
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On Nov 26, 3:59 pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

A 110 *AMP* arc welder will handle just about anything a homeowner can throw at it, including blowing big holes in sheet metal. Are you looking for a 110 *volt* arc welder? The one in your link is a 220 volt, 110 amp.
If your goal is to have something useful for home projects that you can plug into a regular outlet, I highly recommend a 110V MIG welder. If the sticker shock is too much, pick up a used one on craigslist. $200 - $300, maybe.
I have a 110v Arc welder and it always seems too big for small stuff and too small for big stuff.
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