Anyone have a trick for getting Husqvarna chainsaw brake kickback spring back on?

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A bunch of trees fell down on my neighbor's property during the last pineapple express, and his little Ryobi 8" electric chainsaw wasn't up to the task because we stripped the hold-down bolt threads:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7348/16576214195_edee2d2572_c.jpg
So I lent him my Husqvarna 18" chainsaw for chopping up the fallen trees:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7455/16388696590_ca981a9d47_z.jpg
End result is that the kickback spring mechanism must have jammed hard, I think it happened exactly as this picture was taken, actually:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7333/16389857079_8bd6f14257_z.jpg
The result is that I had a devil of a time getting the hold-down cover off today because the chain break coil was tightly wrapped around the chainsaw spinning drum:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7285/16388368248_c088a7f82c_c.jpg
I finally was able to loosen the spring circular kickback clamp, but the spring popped out of his slot in the process:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7288/16389735629_1cf166b3b8_c.jpg
The problem now, is getting the kickback clamp spring back on:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7349/16574371231_5e52e56134_z.jpg
I tried all sorts of leverage tools, but that spring is STRONG!
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7281/16389735569_221282dc75_z.jpg
Anyone know the trick to get that super strong spring back on?
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"Danny D." >

Try sliding it down a thin strip of metal.
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Search on "coil spring compressor" for some ideas. I would use a couple of washers with some tabs and a long screw, washer and nut to compress it.
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On 2/18/2015 10:24 PM, Tom Miller wrote:

Did you actually look at the pictures?
I'll admit, I only looked at one or two. But, the bolt thing won't do much good here.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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outside of the spring. A tab on the edge of the washer goes to the inside of the spring.
There might be better solutions that one could explore.
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Tom Miller wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 14:51:26 -0500:

I have compressed automotive springs, so, I know what you're talking about. It's never gonna work in this particular case.
There's just no room and the spring is too strong for any metal that would actually fit in between the coils and you can't touch the ends since they fit into a recessed slot.
Here it is before it sprung:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7322/16388575300_6361db036e_c.jpg
Here is the after sprung:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7288/16389735629_1cf166b3b8_c.jpg
Plus, there is a fragile plastic insert that goes more than 1/3 of the way through the one end.
Classic spring compressor? Nope. Not gonna work at all. But, it's a good idea for other applications.
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replying to Tom Miller , george wrote:

Incredible, I had this same problem yesterday. After many attempts I was successful, but I can't say it's an optimal method.
Remove the C-ring holding the 3 armed "sprocket" and lift it off it's rod. The sprocket arm is in the locked position. Straigthen this assembly.
Put the spring and its assembly back in the groove with the sprocket assembly out straight , not bent the way you found it. Take a pair of locking pliers and secure the bottom end of the spring to the housing, Not so tight that you damage the spring.
Take a thin screw driver about 3/8' wide and insert between the front of the spring assembly and the housing wall.. Use leverage to compress the spring. Try again. Work from the inside edge of the housing. I was able to squeeze the spring and the "sprocket" arm straightened out. I carefully slipped it over the rod, and then took another locking pliers and lightly secured the front end of the spring.
Then I replaced the C- ring, attached the plastic frame parts, reattached to the chain saw body. Tested it and it worked fine.
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Stormin Mormon wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 08:08:56 -0500:

Chris understood. There's no room, really, for a "spring compressor". I've done McPherson struts, and, this is NOTHING like that since any flimsy metal that fits between the spring coils is NEVER gonna compress that spring.
If you held that spring in between your fingers, for example, you'd NEVER get it to compress visibly. It's also VERY BOUNCY so it sproings all over the place, as you wrestle with leverage tools (e.g., long screwdrivers).
There's no room to get a C-clamp on the ends either, as both ends fit into a recessed slot.
It's not a 0.5-second job, that's for sure.
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do you have a neighbor that is a MAN?
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Pico Rico wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 05:29:02 -0800:

If it was as easy as you're intimating, then this video that Jeff kindly found, would never have been needed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gK7eKakMCz8

That guy did it, and said, verbatim "I'm sure there is some official way to do this, but, I don't know what it is ..."
There are two steps that are not intuitive how to do: 1. Compress the spring to get it in place without poking out an eye, and, 2. Setting the chain brake into the unlock position since it has to be in the locked position in order to get the spring in place.
Luckily, I know how, and it should work for me, and I'll report back when I try it (after responding to these posts).
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Pico Rico wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 05:29:02 -0800:

Oren.
Can you do me a favor and send Pico Rico pictures of the garage door springs and McPherson struts we've removed, replaced and compressed.
He seems to think that those of us endowed with small springs don't also have far larger ones lurking around in our garage that need to be wound ...
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Oren wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 15:19:51 -0800:

Hi Oren,
I had tried packing tape:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7306/16388881368_afb75a36fe_c.jpg
I tried electrical wire:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7284/16597630615_ff28f652dc_z.jpg
But, what worked best was making a temporary cover plate!
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7453/16410601090_8172e71525_c.jpg
Even so, that cover plate only works for HALF the procedure!
The latter half, you use the original black plastic!
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7351/16410598560_de1ffccf41_c.jpg
Of course, that black plastic idea only works if you make a special female socket tool...
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7292/16411791159_84b7dd9775_c.jpg
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On Wednesday, February 18, 2015 at 9:53:17 PM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

I've never had to do one of these. But the procedure for getting any spring like that back on is first to get as much room as possible. From the picture, the part that it pushes against is in it's most forward position, not retracted. IDK what it takes to get that to retract, but if it's retracted, then less compression of the spring will be necessary.
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trader_4 wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 05:57:18 -0800:

Thanks. I watched the video Jeff suggested, and I think that method will work as the guy has overcome exactly the two problems that I need to overcome, which are:
1. Compress the spring enough to get it to STAY in the slot (It bounces all over the place because the amount of force is akin to what it takes to move a refrigerator with one hand pressed up against the bottom with the tip of a screwdriver.)
2. Reset the chain brake without the leverage afforded by the chainsaw handle (you have no leverage and you need to spin a very hard to spin little spoked wheel). The force necessary to spin the spoked while is sort of like spinning a lag bolt with just the tip of a screwdriver wedged into one of the hex crests.)
But, I'm pretty sure I can do it now, as I know *exactly* how not do to it by now!
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On Thu, 19 Feb 2015 02:52:28 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Model number please?
Looks familiar: <
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/chain-saws.jpg
<
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/crud/Husqvarna-136-chain-saw.pdf.jpg
Here's a video on how to do it: <
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gK7eKakMCz8
He just uses a pair of big needle nose pliers and brute force.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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Jeff Liebermann wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 08:47:48 -0800:

Hi Jeff, It's the Husqvarna 445, from the local Lowes and it's about a year old. My neighbor, who is building that suspension bridge here in the redwoods in your neck of the woods (a bit further north than you), borrowed it, and chopped up a nice hard madrone (lovely wood) that had fallen in the last pineapple express.
You probably lost a few antennas in recent weeks (we did).
Anyway, the video was very helpful. I'm amazed you actually found that video, because it's EXACTLY what I need to do! You're utterly amazing, and I don't say that all too lightly.
The video makes it look all so easy, but doesn't mention how fantastically strong that spring is, and, that it flies out all over the place (ask me how I know)...
I like the trick of bolting down a hold-down clamp, as that spring has already bounced all over my garage this morning ...
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would be nice to see the offical tool and the way the factory puts things together. They probably use an expensive tool that is too much for a one time job, so it is nice to know how to do it at home with minimal tools.
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Ralph Mowery wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 16:06:48 -0500:

Yes. I agree. If Husqvarna supplies a video on how "they" get that spring back in place, that would be informative.
Just as you suggested though, just *watching* the video that Jeff supplied taught me to pay extra special attention to three things which were inhibiting success.
Armed with that example, I found a *different* way to accomplish getting the spring in place.
Instead of leveraging with pliers on the outside end of the spring, I leveraged with a two-foot long screwdriver on the *inside* edge of the spring.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7306/16388881368_afb75a36fe_c.jpg
And, I used a few wraps of strong packing tape to hold the spring in place on the outside half:
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8596/16389080810_da0b97e8ab_c.jpg
Now all I have to do is spin the wheel of fortune to the left of that photo, which I'll probably do with a screwdriver or pliers as the guy did in Jeff's wonderful video.
Thanks!
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.

ago. I tried using a screwdriver and finally got the spring on after several tries on each wheel. Just as the spring would get near where it was suspose to be, it would slip off. Then next time I was at the auto store I found a special tool that had a hook on it that would go over the stud. Worked just fine the first time.
I wonder if the Husqvarna people use somethink like that , or if the spring comes compressed with a string or wire holding it in the compressed state and they cut the string when it is in place.
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Ralph Mowery wrote, on Thu, 19 Feb 2015 17:49:33 -0500:

Heh heh., I have that tool with the little pigs' tail on the end. Maybe.... just maybe ... it will fit.
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