Air Conditioner!

Hello,
Forgive the following stupidity. I honestly know nothing about this as I've never owned an air conditioner before.
I just purchased one today, a Maytag model that's about 18 1/2" wide, 13" tall, and 16" deep. Got a good deal, so I was very happy. I brought it back to my apartment, thinking that I knew exactly which window it would go in - but the window is only 17 1/2" wide. It would fit on its side, but I've heard that doesn't work so well.
So I have a few questions:
1) Is it okay to put an air-conditioning unit on its side? This would essentially solve all my problems.
2) What are the downsides to just plugging a window unit in before properly installing it (ie., using it at a lower effectiveness to try to combat the 41-degree humidex in my stifling apartment)?
3) The only other windows in my apartment are larger (maybe 30"x30" squares) that seem quite thoroughly sealed in to their frames. Are there any suggestions that could solve my dilemma with how to install this in there easier perhaps?
Thanks for all your help in advance, and sorry that I know next to nothing and have to bother all of you with my probably simple questions!
-Dan-
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No. They do make units that are designed that way. Look for a casement window design.

If you just sit it in the room and turn it on, the room will get warmer not cooler.

Take it back and bring your measurements with you so you can get one that fits.

--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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On 29 May 2006 11:41:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No. they are designed to go into the window flat.

I am not sure what you mean by this.

It sounds as though you have casement type windows. you may want to return the one you got and get the proper type. there are units made for narrow windows.
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I have casement windows, and wound up buying a portable A/C (the kind on wheels that has an exhaust hose that vents to the outside). To get it to work with casement windows, I had a piece of 1/4" Plexiglas cut so that it is the same exact size as the screen, and I had them cut out a hole for the 5" hose. I put the Plexiglas where the screen normally goes, and when I want to use the A/C I just crank the window open and turn it on. In heavy rain, I shut the unit off and crank the window shut so that the window frame doesn't get soaked. BTW, the hole they cut turned out to be bigger than the hose diameter, which was actually smaller than 5" diameter, so I had to wrap the hose with duct tape to get it to fit snugly.
Granted, the downside is the portable kind that has a single exhaust hose isn't very efficient; they make a lot of noise, and they are expensive compared to window units (at least $300 or $400), and they do look ugly with a dryer-like hose sticking up into the window. Mine is a 9000btu Royal Sovereign, and under hot conditions it probably doesn't actually work any better than a 4000 BTU window unit. I'm only using it to supplement the central A/C in a problematic room so it does the job. It is a self-evaporating unit so I have never had to empty out a drain pan, (but I likely would have to empty it out it weren't merely supplementing the central A/C).
J.
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On 29 May 2006 11:41:05 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

If you get the windowns in 3) open, plus the first window you mentioned, you may be able to be happy with a fan. Or an AC.
What are the window frames in 3 made of? Answers in return. Are they double-hung? Do you see sash cords, sash chains, springs, or anything esle to hold up the bottom window?
Are you sure you have released the latch(es)? How old is your building?
Do any of your neighbors' windows of this size open? Ask them if you could try their windows, or at least watch, to see how to unlatch and how hard to get up and down.
Almost all windows can be freed up, a bit at a time, being careful not to break the glass. Details depend on what they are made of.

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

As noted, you can't run an A/C on it's side. I'd check with the building super / maint. person, they should know about the larger windows and perhaps other options.
Pete C.
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