Air brad nailer - instructions?

A while ago I picked up a cheap, no-name pneumatic brad nailer. The instructions that came with it are pretty much useless. It's worked well the few times I've used it.
I'm going to be installing some molding with this gun and don't want to split or drive through the material, so I'm trying to locate some instructions on how best to use this gun.
It will drive 18 gauge nails or staples, 3/4" to 2" (?) in length. On the back of the head there appears to be an adjustment knob that turns easily about 90 degrees, but doesn't appear to do anything.
So, I'd like to know...
- What is the optimum air pressure to supply the nailer with? - Should that top actually adjust anything? - Any links on how to use a brad nailer properly?
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Calab wrote:

Probably 90-100 PSI.

It is most likely an adjustable vent. When you fire the gun, does air come out of it? If so, then it is adjustable so that you can turn it away from you when using it at different angles.

Press it to the wood and fire. Hold it against the wood firmly and learn exactly where the brad comes out so that you can center the nail where you want it to go.
Don't shoot yourself.
Don't shoot anyone else.
Don't shoot pets or other animals, unless they are attacking you.
Check often to make sure you still have brads in the gun. It is a pain to find out that that piece of trim was nailed with nothing but air.
Oil the gun daily (a few drops in the air inlet).
Keep it clean and clean it regularly.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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Calab wrote:

Probably 80-100 pounds. Air pressure may be the only way of adjusting the depth of the nail. At the least, the air pressure will be a rough guide. There may be a fine adjustment on the gun.

Nah, it's for the exhaust.

Aside from other tips, practice with scraps of the stuff you're going to nail and the actual surface into which you intend to nail it. For example, nailing a bit of moulding into wood will differ from nailing that same bit of moulding into 1/2" of sheetrock before the nail hits wood.
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Wear eye protection!!!
Make sure the gun is not in bump fire mode, meaning you have to pull the trigger to fire the nail.
Practice with scraps of wood.
Do not adjust the nail depth with the gun attached to the air hose.
Have a nail set handy
Unplug your compressor and release the air from tank after using it.
A few drops of oil in the gun air hole before use.

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