Additional Lock for Security Door

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On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 13:34:17 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

If they're going to bother breaking the door, wouldn't a window be a better choice? Better go for bars over the windows, too. If you're going to live like a prisoner, might just as well have the look.
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I agree. I was simply pointing out that putting a security bar in the middle of the door makes no sense. Our friend micky claims he knows people who do it that way. If he says so, who am I to argue? If they think they know better than the manufacturer, so be it.
Now, not that I would doubt anything micky claims, it is interesting that he knows a number of people who use the bar in a manner not specified in the instructions, but again, if he says so, why would I possibly doubt his honesty?
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On Sun, 13 Oct 2013 16:49:38 +0000 (UTC), DerbyDad03

I didn't feel like writing yesterday. Here's an answer more to the point of your post.

Who says the door is weak? Does the presence of added door jamb locks imply the door jambs were weak, or only that the first lock used was weak?

They sell that too.

You're too caught up in your "theory", which is not surprising since you haven't been exposed to these issues in real life.

If all the locks are at the jamb, a steel battering ram, which the police and some burglars use, has leverage equal to half the width of the door. When a floor bar lock is set in the middle of the door, the door has to be hit off center and there is effectively only the leverage of one quarter the width of the door. You have doubled to the strength of the door for lots less money and less effort than buying a door which is twice as strong, and probably hard to find or inconveniently heavy.

You have read the instructions? For a Fox police lock?
http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/853111_2267_7721259 Here's a picture of an installed lock. You'll note that if you divide the width into 4 parts, it's mounted in part 2 or 3, adjacent to the midline of the door. The bar itself is about 1/3 of the way from one edge to the other. Other people mount them in the middle of the door.
This model is designed so that it can be locked from the outside, with a key. While inside the bar is laid into the darker area, a slot. From the outside, the key is turned and the bar is pushed to the right (in the picture), where it can't get out.

You shouldn't, if you have any sense.
BTW, Medeco lock cylinders are much harder to pick, but afaik that is their only advantage. They work well with a good lock behind them.
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Nowadays we used some advanced Door lock systems like Digital and touchscreen locks for doors. prefare good quality lock systems with cheap cost.
http://www.kalanjiamhardwares.com/
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On Thursday, October 10, 2013 7:40:13 PM UTC-4, Scott J wrote:

If you're just looking for additional security while you're home, you could install a cane bolt which fits into a hole in the floor.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Stanley-National-Hardware-5-8-in-x-18-in-Black-Cane-Bolt-CD1009-5-8X18-CANE-BLT-B/203593259
This reminds me of a Woody Allen routine. He said that he had six locks on his apartment door but only locked three of them. That way, anyone trying to pick the locks would always be locking as many as they were unlocking.
Paul
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