Above-ground Stump removal ideas needed

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I'm with you, chief. Buy the saw and you can keep it when you're done. I got some safety training some years ago, and it's worth every penny.
Moving the clay is going to be a challenge. The pressure washer.... let us know if it works?
The one stump I removed, I used a sawzall, and a lot of blades. I got the cheep blades from Harbor Freight, so I didn't worry much about wearing the teeth off. And wear them out, I surely did.
After the roots are exposed and dry out, maybe kerosene and burn them out?
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How do you remove an underground stump?
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Hehe...
100 interesting and fun things to do with high nitrogen fertilizer.........
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SVL



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With a backhoe.
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Tony wrote:

Is there some reason you can't blast 'em out?
Dynamite is easy to use. The guys who sell it can give you pointers.
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Well, considering that one of the stumps is about 3' from my house, I'm a bit tentative about using such extreme measures. :)
Tony
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The
Ignore Jerry, he thinks he is witty.
I take it you don't live in the kind of neighborhood where you can just drag the rootballs to a disused corner of the lot, and leave them as habitat for small creatures? All sorts of things would be very happy living in the nooks and crannies. Failing that, simplest solution is to just clean out and deepen the holes they came out of, and bury them. If planting replacement trees makes that not an option, you are either facing a whole lot of manual labor with shovel and ax and maul and wedges, or a decent sized check to somebody with the equipment to get them out of there w/o trashing your lawn and sprinklers and such. Dirty wood like that will kill a chainsaw quick, and possibly you, too, from kickback when it jams. People who clear trees for a living, when they can get away with it, dozer the root balls and other chaff into bigass piles, soak with #2, and burn them. Unless you can leave them sit till weather washes dirt off, chipper guy won't even want to touch them- those dirt clods really cut blade life.
aem sends....
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other
touch
That's not completely true. At a local golf course where they cleared some woods, all of the stumps were taken out with an excavator and placed in a huge pile. Then some special piece of machinery was brought in that looked like a 10 foot diameter cylinder, maybe 8-10 feet high. Inside the cylinder was a giant flail spinning at a high speed. The giant stumps were dropped in and what came out of this machine was a nice steady stream of rich looking soil. I think it was less than 30 seconds to reduce a stump of a 18" diameter tree to 'nothing'.
-al sung
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(snip)

cylinder
in
Wow- never seen that particular sort of device before. Sounds like a Tim Taylor special. Guess things have progressed a little since I got an inside job. Ordinary stump grinders and towed chippers for liftable chunks were all I ever got to see close up, and both of those weren't that hard to jam.
aem sends...
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Drum grinders. Come in big and bigger sizes. They are what are used for logging operations, and municipal yard waste recycling.
Amazing what you can find on the 'net, if you do a thorough search for chipper/shredders. <G>
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Yeah it's called a tub grinder, make nice mulch.
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Tony wrote:

Don't know whether burning is allowed - best to check. We had a palm stump that we wanted to, at least, get the top off so's we could lay pavers over the area. Palms are like a ball of twine, soak up water and do not cut with a saw very easily. We soaked it with denatured alcohol - which I think mixes with water - and then burned it down. Do not leave unattended, and do not put more alcohol on it when you think the fire is out but it isn't :o) Keep kids away and keep fire extinguisher handy. It's quite a shock to be holding a gallon can of alc. and to suddenly see flames coming from the can :o)
Good luck with Jeanne and Lisa :o)
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I read through the thread and don't really see any suggestions that you can use except for possibly burning. My approach would be a comgination of some of them. Pressure washer to get as much dirt as possible off, chain saw to cut them into chunks you can move.
No, cutting up the dirty root balls will not destroy your saw. It will destroy your chain, bar, drive sprocket and possibly the clutch. These are easily replaceable and not that expensive. Even just pitching the saw away at the end of the job will be cheaper than any other method (except burning) You will also be sharpening the chain several times while working.
This is one of those jobs that will cost money (unless you can burn them in place). Some jobs just can't be done 'on the cheap'.
Harry K
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There's another approach which is easy, inexpensive, and won't damage anything, but it does take a lot of time: rotting it out.
Wood will decompose into soil given four additional ingredients: air, water, nitrogen, and bacteria.
Air: Expose as much of the stump as possible. Drill holes into it to let air in.
Water: Water it frequently; try to keep it moist. If you can, rig up a drip to keep it constantly moist. If possible, keep it out of the sun so it won't dry out as quickly.
Nitrogen: Apply a high nitrogen fertilizer
Bacteria: Get some rotten leaves or soil (the stuff you scoop out of your gutters is good), and spread it over the stump.
If you see mushrooms growing on and around the stump, and see grubs burrowing in it, then you are doing it right. Fungi, insects, and bacteria will all work to convert the wood back to soil.
If you keep a compost pile, start a new one on top of the stump.
It may take a year or more.
--- Chip
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snipped-for-privacy@red.seas.upenn.edu (Charles H. Buchholtz) wrote:

Better yet, drill holes in the stump, and pour in some stump remover (aka KNO3; potassium nitrate; saltpeter) which you can get at the hardware store.
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On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 16:07:45 +0000 (UTC), someone wrote:

Probably disqualifies that method, for this application.
He isn't covered by insurance for this???? (Unless it fell on the house I suppose.)
Sounds like disaster cleanup to me.
-v.
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In article snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net says...

As has been discussed before, even talking with your insurance agent will require him to register your conversation in a database used to raise your premium. If you see your insurance agent walking down a street, divert your eyes, walk in a different direction, and don't let him see you.
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On Tue, 28 Sep 2004 01:57:15 -0500, someone wrote:

I think that's crap in a case like this. This is mainly a worry for people who have a history of numerous petty claims, like they are "trying to get their money's worth" out of their insurance. Naturally there will be some folks who claim its not their fault, they are not like that, its just circumstances, and maybe some are right, but they fit the pattern.
But THIS TIME there was a frickin' HURRICANE. Everybody's premiums in the whole area are likely to be effected by such conditions, while OTOH nobody in the area would not stand out merely for making an inquiry.
In the age of computers, that insurance companies track each covered premises, is fearful news only to superstitious homeowners. We operate four commerial properties and it is routine that RFPs for renewal quotes include a 3 year "loss run" (history) for each location. A zero loss report or inquiry is just that, no loss. Not a big deal. "Required to register" makes thing sound much more sinister than they are. There is a 'file' on each property - so what - no surprise there.
But as OP clarified, as the trees did not hit his house, they are 'merely' landscaping and not covered.
-v.
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Beg to differ. Case in point Farmer's insurance in exas in 2001-2002. The majority of people had rates rise 75-150% for no claims at all. and a lot even went up 200% for very small claims.

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Nope. Get a CLUE.
http://oci.wi.gov/pub_list/pi-207.htm
"C.L.U.E. reports indicate losses by type. Consumers should be aware that contacting their company or their agent to discuss an actual loss might be considered reporting a claim, even if the company does not end up making a claim payment. This is because when a loss occurs, the policy requires the company to take specific actions within specified time frames. Consumers should be specific as to whether they are filing a claim or only making an inquiry."
http://www.realestatejournal.com/buysell/taxesandinsurance/20030814-spors.html
"Many home insurers count inquiry calls -- calls in which homeowners simply ask informally whether their policy will cover certain damages and are told that it won't -- as unpaid losses."
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