9v. battery disposal

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wrote Re 9v. battery disposal:

Instead of a small piece of duct tape, how about two or three full turns of duct tape? That should completely encase the battery in tape.
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Hell, why not just build a little wood box for each and every battery? A guy could kill a week that way.
s

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I already have lamps on 9V battery connectors. Not much time wasted to drain the duds.
As for other sizes - I toss them in a municipal trash can far enough from buildings (in a township with an aggressive fire department and only a few blocks from the nearest fire station) when I cycle by that trash can on my way to work. Heck, I dump 9V ones there also.
Nothing is a cause of a majority of home fires. Some college campus areas have exceptions to that - either from overcooking of microwave popcorn (awfully easy to do very spectacularly, easily catastrophically) or horseplay with fire.
Other more significant fire causes are smoking in bed, children playing with matches/lighters, unattended cooking, malfunctioning/abused/substandard electrical products (extension cords rank somewhere significantly here), misused space heaters, and somewhere after that malfunctioning home wiring.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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<stuff snipped>

Sorry, but I have to differ with you. Cooking is by and far the largest culprit:
http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID03&itemID(255&URL=Learning/Public%20education/Fire%20Prevention%20Week/Fast%20facts%20about%20fire&cookie%5Ftest=1
says: Cooking
a.. Cooking fires are the #1 of home fires and home fire injuries. b.. In 2005, cooking equipment was involved in 146,400 reported home structure fires, the largest share for any major cause. These fires resulted in 480 civilian deaths, 4,690 civilian injuries, and $876 million in direct property damage. c.. The majority of home fires - 40% - start in the kitchen. d.. Unattended cooking is the leading factor contributing to ignition in home cooking fires, accounting for one-third of such fires. More than half of all cooking fire injuries occurred when people tried to fight the fire themselves. e.. Most home cooking fires (67%) in 2005 started with the range or stove. f.. Electric ranges or stoves have a higher risk of fires, deaths, injuries and property damage, compared to gas ranges or stoves.
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<stuff snipped>

Sorry, Don, but I have to differ with you, just slightly. Cooking is by and far the largest culprit:
http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID03&itemID(255&URL=Learning/Public%20education/Fire%20Prevention%20Week/Fast%20facts%20about%20fire&cookie%5Ftest=1
says:
a.. Cooking fires are the #1 cause of home fires and home fire injuries. b.. In 2005, cooking equipment was involved in 146,400 reported home structure fires, the largest share for any major cause. These fires resulted in 480 civilian deaths, 4,690 civilian injuries, and $876 million in direct property damage. c.. The majority of home fires - 40% - start in the kitchen. d.. Unattended cooking is the leading factor contributing to ignition in home cooking fires, accounting for one-third of such fires. More than half of all cooking fire injuries occurred when people tried to fight the fire themselves. e.. Most home cooking fires (67%) in 2005 started with the range or stove. f.. Electric ranges or stoves have a higher risk of fires, deaths, injuries and property damage, compared to gas ranges or stoves.
The stats are indeed complicated because although there are a lot of kitchen fires, the much fewer number of space heater and tobacco smoking fires prove far more deadly on a "per fire" basis, probably because the residents are asleep when most space heater or cigarette fires begin. More than half of all home fire deaths result from incidents reported between 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., but only 20% of home fires occur between these hours.
You can reduce your risk of death by one half, simply by using enough smoke detectors. Stealing just a little more from the National Fire Protection Association site:
a.. 65% of reported home fire deaths in 2000-2004 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. a.. The fire death rate in homes with working smoke alarms is 51% less than the rate for homes without this protection. a.. In one out of every five homes equipped with at least one smoke alarm installed, not a single one was working. a.. When smoke alarms fail it is most often because of missing, disconnected or dead batteries. Nuisance activations were the leading cause of disabled smoke alarms.
The fact that electrical wiring is indicted in so relatively few fires (20K) is really a testament to the continual advances in electrical safety technology that tend to protect all but the most stupid. One interesting fact from the above site is that cords and plugs were involved in one-eighth (12%) of the 2002-2005 home electrical distribution and lighting equipment fires, but roughly two-fifths (39%) of associated civilian deaths.
Someday, all stoves and ranges will have built-in fire supression systems that are computer controlled and can easily distinguish between someone cooking cherries flambe and a towel leaning against a burner. Compared to the safety interlocks on most furnaces, stoves and ranges have a long, long way to go before cooking drops out of the top spot as an ignition point for home fires.
-- Bobby G.
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SteveB wrote:

Just throw them in your chipper/shredder.
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Anyone who posts: "TIA, idiots, flamers and phobics, please don't reply." get what they deserve.
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SteveB wrote:

I just throw mine in the trash, BUT I also used to store them in my top bureau drawer out of their package with my 9mm bullets rolling around in the same drawer.... somehow they got discharged.?.?. I have since stopped that practice.. But I never got shot, go figure! I think they are not a threat. Clark...
--
Don\'t you have Google in your part of the world?



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SteveB wrote:

You have to come to grips with the fact that there is no reliable, cheap, and legal way to dispose of used batteries.
What I do with things that fall into that category is to leave them in a school-yard. At night.
I got the idea from a Dilbert cartoon - Dilbert's boss said that's what he did with his old refrigerator.
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