5 year old roof needs replaced again

5 years ago we had our original slate roof replaced on our house built in 1915 with 30 year Elk asphalt architectural shingles. The roofers did not have to replace any woof as it was all solid and in good shape. The wood beams on the roof are butted close to each other with little to no space between them.
Recently a large 6' x 4' section of shingles slide down the south side of the roof exposing the felt paper below. The original roofer is long gone. We called out another well known roofer in the area to inspect/repair the section that fell.
His immediate reaction was that the roof wasn't nailed correctly. He threw down a section of shingles and showed us how the nail heads had pulled right through the shingles. He explained that there is a nail strip where you are supposed to nail into the shingle. These were nailed several inches above the area where he said was the proper place.
Only the south side has been effected so far and to be safe and sure we are going to have the entire roof replaced again.
The question I have is about the underlying wood and kind of shingles we can use. The roofer who came out and told us about the nail strip suggested that if we want to use an architectural shingle again that we re-sheet the entire roof with new wood. He says that the nail strip on an architectural shingle is too narrow and would need new wood. The nail area on a 3-tab is much larger and would not require new wood to nail on.
Another roofer says that's BS and if he did encounter any spots that were questionable, he would only re-sheet that area. The difference is about $2000 to have it re-sheeted or not.
Any other opinions? We'd really like to keep the architectural shingle look but are not sure whether or not we need to re-sheet the entire roof as the first roofer suggested. As I said above the wood is in good shape and there are no soft spots anywhere.
Todd
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In typed:

I'd go with the guy that only replaces what's bad. It makes his estimate less accurate, but it makes more sense and is how we did it. Roof's now about ten, and in perfect shape. Get all the details & supplies in writing.
Pop`
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I don't know much about roofing, but I can see his logic if if your description of the wood underneath is accurate.
What you have are planks, right? Probably a good chance that there are gaps, however small, between the planks.
To keep the architectural shingles in a straight row he might end up with the nail strip right on one of these gaps, giving no hold to the shingles there.
Have you considered steel roofing? It can come in many patterns and should go down on that planking with little effort.
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Why didnt you just repair the slate, get a few more bids, I think you have been dealing with crooks.
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at lewast make a warranty claim with the shingle manufacturer. what do you have to lose?
heck they may give you some sort oif discount and cant hurt. if the installer was a factoiry authorized one they might cover the entire cost.....
they also would have opinion on all new wood.
i would rather spend extra money on that rubber sealing underlayment than all new wood
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Don't the asphalt shingles require (according to the manufacturer and warranty) sheathing?] Those planks are great for slate (although they are _supposed_ to have fairly large gaps, IIRC) -- and its a shame you (had to?) get rid of them. Nothing you put on will ever look as nice or last as long. Anyway, I'd have put sheathing on the first time around before the shingles. Now its a toss up. But the first guy is right about the nails -- it is going to be a pain to get those nails in the right places. It is unlikely to affect the whole roof. But it is sure to show up as a problem again and again for several years, until all of the poorly nailed sheets come off.
-Kevin
snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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I'd either go with a completelyh new metal roof system - very expenive but will last 50 years plus and look fabulous,. or Only patch what is necessary
depending on how tight money is.
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If the roofer dead, if not then take to small claims for the maximum, its fairly quick
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Is that true? I was told by a usually trustworthy person that the fasteners are supposed to be 'serviced' every 12 years, IIRC.
G
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On Tue, 01 Aug 2006 01:29:45 GMT, George

Riduculous. Absolutely not true. You shouldn't let anyone on your roof for 50 years. Really.
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Depends on what you're using for a metal roofing system, and what you mean by "serviced".
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My roof is regular asphalt shingles. My family has always done our own roofs, and I find them interesting. Lately, I've been seeing more of what I'd call 'formed metal' roofing (mostly blue, if that helps). So, I asked someone about them.
As best I recall, he said there were two types. One has the fasteners are exponsed, but driven through a a rubber washer to seal them. The other has blind fasteners - I assume under the interlock of the metal pieces. I think he said that the first kind has very poor durability, and even for the second kind, the specs called for something to be done to it (my memory fails me here) about every 12 yrs.
G
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It's a pity you got rid of your slate roof. Our old neighborhood in Pittsburgh consisted of houses built between 1910 and 1935, nearly all were stone & brick houses and many of them had their original slate roofs. It's hard to find a competent person to work on them but by golly they last.
I'm currently in Ithaca, working at Cornell University in the civil engineering department. I was doing some archival work and found a campus wide roof inventory and a subsequent study about roof maintenance procedures done in the 1980s. Many of the older buildings on campus were built with slate roofs and in the 1970, campus maintenance started to replace those roofs with asphalt shingles (it was the modern thing to do). However the conclusion of the study was that it was, by far, more cost effective to keep the slate roofs. While a slate roof does need individual slates replaced every so often and maintenance (regular attention to flashing & leaks before they become a problem), overall they last pretty much forever. OTOH, asphalt roofs need to be completely replaced every 10-20 years.
Chris
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Slate detoriates over time and costs too much to replace.
It weathers away very slowly till its paper thin. walking on it is very dangerous leads to cracking, nails rust off and the felt paper underneath is GONE, and thats really the waterproofing:(
theres recycled plastic that looks like slate withn a guarantee longer than shingles to maintain the look at a fraction of the cost.....
like everything else slate doesnt last forever. my best friend had his slate roof replaced with shingles a few years ago. the slate some looked like lorraine swiss cheese really thin with all holes. arease that hadnt weathered were great and perhaps 5 times thicker
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I would have loved to keep the slate but it was in poor shape. When we purchased the house someone had applied some kind of thin rubber coating over the slate to make it look better / seal some leaks. Well that just made everything worse as over time it allowed water in and softened much of the roof up.
Re: the original roofer - it was a sub-contractor and that company is no-where to be found. We contact the state attorney generals office and they say that the statute of limitations in Ohio is two years. The original workmanship warranty from the sub-contractor was one year. Not much we can do now.
Warranty claim - we did contact Elk and they sent out a warranty package. They wanted a sample of a shingle which clearly shows that it wasn't nailed correctly. No sense bothering with that.
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Todd wrote:

I have a similar problem. In 1994 I had a new roof put over the original 1972 roof. That roof is now dead. There are probably 1000s of people with is problem. The shingles are from Certainteed and it has been determined thay are defective. Certainteed will pay a pro-rated amount on the shngles (big deal) but nothing on the labor, which is about 80% of the cost. There are presently class action suits being filed in several states.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

this is almost complete bs!!!
My closest friend bought a fire damaged house over 20 years ago and stripped the slate, redid the roof and replaced the removed slate.
hasn't touched it since[in any serious way anyway]
He would probably be due a roof by now if he had put asphalt
SO I will go with slate over plastic, his slate is by an large 150 years old now, and doing just fine.
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Not all slate is the same.
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Goedjn wrote:

yeah some is harder than others or weathers away differently.
sadly nothing lasts forever even heavy copper is rated at about a 100 years.
some rain has more acids etc leading to faster detoriation
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