1 or 2 outlets for 4 foot bathroom vanity sink/cabinet

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Doing a bathroom reno. Just curious any requirements for outlets for a 4 foot vanity? I know the code is you can put an outlet anywhere as long as it is within 3 foot of the edge of the sink, but I was thinking putting one on each side of the vanity. Any issues with this?
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thats what i did, one duplex outlet on either side....
reason hair dryer curling iron radio etc
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On 6/22/2012 7:07 AM, bob haller wrote:

I'll join the rest. YES, as a minimum. It is hard to get too many outlets.
Bill
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I am not very observant:( actually I have two double boxes on either side the first outlet fed by a GFCI. I did that upgrade over 15 years ago..... time flies...
it costs little to have extra outlets if your doing the job yourself
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wrote:

I have my TV, radio, wireless speaker adapter (that receives sound from the computer), and Powermid TV remote control transmitter plugged in all the time.
And I used to plug in an electric toothbrush,
Not all of these will run at the same time, and some use next to no currrent, but who wants to keep plugging and unplugging.
I'll bet there are other things too, especially if someone else lives there too. I don't think 2 duplex is necessarily enough.
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On 6/22/2012 8:07 AM, bob haller wrote:

Also make sure they're 20 amp Heavy duty outlets feed by a 20 amp circuit.
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wrote:

20A circuit, sure. Why a 20A outlet?
- The pins on the cord are only rated for 15A - 20A plugs have a different pin configuration (one rotated 90 degrees) - 20A outlets are only rated for 20A for 20A plugs (see above) - 15A outlets are rated for 20A pass through
Just buy good outlets ($2, not $.29).
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Actually, a 20 amp T-Slot receptacle can be used for both 15 and 20 amp cord ends. Used primarily for kitchen counter circuits so that we can provide GFCI protection in proximity to sinks, it would also work well in a bathroom application.
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On Jun 23, 1:28pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

That's what grd fault outlets are for.
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hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

I can't remember for sure, but I think the national Electrical Code says something about switches and outlets not being permitted within 48 inches of a shower or tub (or something like that). The idea is so that people standing in a shower or tub won't be able to reach the switch or outlet. I don't think the fact that the outlet is GFCI would change that requirement even though GFCI's are required in bathrooms.
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On 6/23/2012 6:45 PM, TomR wrote:

There is actually no such requirement in the Nec
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wrote:

Thanks. I thought for sure that there was such a requirement in the NEC. But, I know you know this stuff, and after reading what you wrote I did a lot of Google searching on the subject. And, just as you said, there is no such requirement in the U.S.A. I did find a requirement regarding lighting fixtures (luminaires) being within 3 feet of, or less than 8 feet above, a wet area etc. But, there is nothing like that for receptacles or switches. Amazing.
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On 6/23/2012 10:15 PM, TomR wrote:

Strange to me as well. I actually saw a light switch in the tile directly over a bathtub. This was an original installation, in a 1920 mansion

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On 6/23/2012 2:14 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

ends. Used primarily for kitchen counter circuits so that we can provide GFCI protection in proximity to sinks, it would also work well in a bathroom application.

krw was not questioning the 20 amp circuit, just the 20 amp receptacles, as they are not required by the Nec. His point was that a decent quality 15 amp receptacle will suffice
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On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 11:14:01 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The cord end is either 15A or 20A. The 20A variety has a different configuration. Using a 20A receptacle makes no sense unless you're going to use 20A plugs.

Huh? That sentence makes no sense. WTF does GFCI have to do with the receptacle type?
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On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 13:05:24 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

This line eludes me. Pass 20A through to the next receptacle?? but not to something plugged in to the 15A outlet?

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On 6/23/2012 2:37 PM, micky wrote:

Typical duplex receptacles are designed to be daisy-chained together. The conductive buss of a 15 amp duplex receptacle is rated for 20 amps, so you can chain a bunch of 15 amp outlets along a 20 amp cable.
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Yes. The contacts are rated for 15A but the receptacle is rated for 20A total (both outlets or pass-thru). In reality, it's about the plug, not the receptacle. A 15A receptacle will *only* handle a 15A plug. 20A receptacles will accommodate both 15A and 20A plugs.

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On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 20:52:19 -0400, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Thanks, you and RBM.
Now I'm dying to have a 20A device so I can have one of those cool plugs on the end.
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Just don't confuse it with a 240V plug. They look the same (in a mirror ;).
I had a computer installed, many years ago. The *stupid* CE didn't recognize the difference (between a 240V plug and a 120V/20A) and was about to cut the plug off and replace it with one that would "fit".
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