Old gasoline

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I have a couple of gallons of old gasoline, probably at least a year old. I suppose I could dispose of it properly, but I was wondering of it could be "revived" somehow or used instead?
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if the container was tight and there's no 2 cycle oil in it, the gas may be in better condition than you might think. as long as it's clean (no water, etc in the bottom) you can probably use it. test a little of it in a lawnmower or whatever, and i think you'll find that it is usable.
bill

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Cant be revived. Its gone bad. If anything you can mix it with fresh gas and run it on lawnmowers snowblowers etc. (would put it into a car, might damage things)
Might not run the best but sometimes it better than dumping.
Otherwise you can use it to kill weeds grass etc along the fence.
Tom
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Nah; that'll cause a bunch of bare spots. What you should do is mix it with your booze and drink it yourself.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Naw, you can put a gallon or two of old gas into a car tank that's more or less full with new gas (and has room, duh) without screwing anything up. The new gas has enough reserve solvent capacity to keep anything solidifying from the old gas in solution. At least, that's what the lawnmower and snowblower sites I've been looking at lately tell me.
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I put a gallon at a time in my car's nearly full tank. Hasn't hurt it yet.
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I found that adding old gasoline to my Farmall Cub tractor caused severe valve sticking. I recently talked to someone removing heads from an air cooled VW who had done the same thing. It is highly variable, you may very well be able to mix it with fresh fuel and burn it without trouble. Don Young

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Srgnt Billko wrote:

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Srgnt Billko wrote:

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Add it to your truck next time.
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Didn't you mean "add it to your neighbor's truck"?
--

Christopher A. Young
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FDR wrote:

You will get all sorts of answers, possibly because of varying conditions but often due to blind prejudice. First 1 year old is not a problem, 2 years old means be careful, 3 years old means be really careful and the best advice is to dump it. If the container is full or nearly, if it wasn't subject to high or warm temperatures for the entire period the gas will be in much better condition that stored in a 1/2 full can and at higher temperatures.
If it really is about 1 year old just added a gallon of it at a time to 18 or more gallons of gas in any vehicle.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

George has it right. My suggestion is to add a little at a time to your car's gas tank. Only do this with a nearly full tank in the car. No more than a gallon at a time, I would use less. Diluted like this will be safe for your car.
Today's gas is better than that of years ago so it will last longer before going bad, which it does just a little at a time.
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

Yes and no... the advent of in-tank electric fuel pumps for fuel injection, which are not prone to vapor lock, has led to the refineries leaving a lot of the real light fractions in the gasoline that they couldn't in the past, so that they evaporate out more. In fact, older evaporative pollution control systems from the early 80s and such get maxed out by current fuel. Whether that would be a problem for a lawnmower with no fuel pump is dubious, of course.

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z wrote:

True, but evaporation is not ... well in some cases it could be, the problem of old gas. It is the chemical reactions within the gas that is the usual problem.

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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

The evaporation will lead to hard starting, but the oxidation etc. are what causes varnish and sediment.
Long boring story: I bought a 7 year old Corvair at one point; the fancy kind with 4 carbs, two primaries and two secondaries. Only the primaries had idle jets this early in production, and the secondaries were on a progressive linkage, which meant that unless you floored it, the gas did not flow through them, just sat and slowly evaporated out of the float bowls. I guess whoever owned it did not drive very energetically, as I discovered that both secondary fuel bowls were absolutely and completely full of solid matter that could not be removed with any amount of carb cleaner and manual labor, and the carbs had to be junked. I wonder why the original owner went for the 4 carb version in the first place?

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snipped-for-privacy@snail-mail.net writes:

Yep, what a waste. That car was a lot of fun. I had a Corvair convertible with the same setup.
I bought the kit that replaced the 4 carbs with a center mounted Holly 4 barrel. Zoooom!
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I bought a 1970 (approx) vintage Toro Snowhound 20.
No air cleaner at all? Not even a screen to keep mice out in the summer? Is this normal for the industry?
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