my new lawn has weeds & appears in bad shape

I live in Florida, the lawn is st. augustine. Someone please help. My new residence had new sod placed since june 2005, 6 months ago.
Here's what I have done to maintain the soil: 1)Fertilized with scotts turf builder once a month. 2)Mow 4 times a month. I situate the blade position at a height reasonable enough to mow the top of the grass, so as not to mow too close to the soil. 3)Water at least 5x a week, early in the morning.
Yet, I have noticed that the lawn is in bad shape. Here's a list of annoyances: 1)slender stalks of weed sprouting out. 2)bald patches. 3)thatch.
Is there anything else I can do to "cure" my lawn? Should I call for a re-sodding?
It's annoying that the neighbor across the street has such a nice green lawn, while mine, being 6 month old, is crappy & in total blight.
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Without knowing how much fertilizer and how much water you are using on each application, it looks like you're using waaaay too much of both if you're fertilizing each month and watering 5x a week.
The practices you've described can lead to fungus problems and a weak root system for the sod, which will then encourage weeds and insect problems.
For information on how to maintain a Florida lawn, go to the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods pages on the University of Florida website, and download the FY&N handbook, or go to your local extension service and get FY&N information there. The FY&N info really works.
The handbook and some handouts from the Extension Service will give you better information on how often to fertilize and how much to water. For mowing St. Augustine grass, keep the blade at least three inches high, and mow frequently enough so that you never cut off more than about 1/3 of the blades of grass.
Also, recheck on the amount of soluble nitrogen in the Scotts product you've been using. If it's high, switch to something with less soluble nitrogen and a more slow-release capability. Lesco makes good Florida-oriented sod fertilizers and avoids too much soluble nitrogen.
You might also ask your new neighbor how he maintains his yard . . .
Regards --

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Without knowing how much fertilizer and how much water you are using on each application, it looks like you're using waaaay too much of both if you're fertilizing each month and watering 5x a week.
The practices you've described can lead to fungus problems and a weak root system for the sod, which will then encourage weeds and insect problems.
For information on how to maintain a Florida lawn, go to the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods pages on the University of Florida website, and download the FY&N handbook, or go to your local extension service and get FY&N information there. The FY&N info really works.
The handbook and some handouts from the Extension Service will give you better information on how often to fertilize and how much to water. For mowing St. Augustine grass, keep the blade at least three inches high, and mow frequently enough so that you never cut off more than about 1/3 of the blades of grass.
Also, recheck on the amount of soluble nitrogen in the Scotts product you've been using. If it's high, switch to something with less soluble nitrogen and a more slow-release capability. Lesco makes good Florida-oriented sod fertilizers and avoids too much soluble nitrogen.
You might also ask your new neighbor how he maintains his yard . . .
Regards --

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Without knowing how much fertilizer and how much water you are using on each application, it looks like you're using waaaay too much of both if you're fertilizing each month and watering 5x a week.
The practices you've described can lead to fungus problems and a weak root system for the sod, which will then encourage weeds and insect problems.
For information on how to maintain a Florida lawn, go to the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods pages on the University of Florida website, and download the FY&N handbook, or go to your local extension service and get FY&N information there. The FY&N info really works.
The handbook and some handouts from the Extension Service will give you better information on how often to fertilize and how much to water. For mowing St. Augustine grass, keep the blade at least three inches high, and mow frequently enough so that you never cut off more than about 1/3 of the blades of grass.
Also, recheck on the amount of soluble nitrogen in the Scotts product you've been using. If it's high, switch to something with less soluble nitrogen and a more slow-release capability. Lesco makes good Florida-oriented sod fertilizers and avoids too much soluble nitrogen.
You might also ask your new neighbor how he maintains his yard . . .
Regards --

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Won't fall for the "I live in some state", leading to assumptions. Other than insinuating that your fertilizer influencing growth and obvious response like photosynthesis green, you never said what the soil is under the sod. Prep?
Sod is seldom layed tight enough to eliminate potential for weeds. What lay dormant temporarily in the sod is another problem.
Over watering is as bad as drought conditions, but for different reasons.
Depending on preparation, drainage, irrigation, current underlying soil, varmints, bugs and disease that affect roots, a good lawn may take 2-5 years to establish to some degree of perceived visible perfection.
--
Lil' Dave
Beware the rule quoters, the corp mindset, the Borg
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snipped-for-privacy@usa.com wrote:

(mind I said local not chain)
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