Purely-Natural Gas-Fired Blue-Flame Infrared Radiant Heater

Hi:
I’m thinking of hypothetical purely-natural gas fired radiant heater in which the significant emitter of thermal radiation is the flame itself.
The fuel is purely-natural gas. By “purely natural”, I mean it is the raw, unprocessed, and unrefined natural gas straight from the marshes. In terms of oxidant/fuel ratio, the flame is stoichiometric. Oxygen [O2] is the only oxidant to burn the fuel.
Each and every molecule of the fuel is fully-oxidized by the oxygen but without there being any excess of oxygen.
There are 6 sides to this radiant heater. Left, right, back, front, up, and down. The height of the left, right, front and back are the same. The top and bottom are shorter in length than the heights of the aforementioned. However, the top and bottom are of the same width as the widths of the left and right. The front of the heater is what faces the object intended to be heated. The front consists of eco- friendly material that is completely transparent to all EM radiation from 100,000 nm to 300 nm. The interior of the back of the heater consists of eco-friendly material that completely reflects all wavelengths of EM radiation from 100,000 nm to 300 nm. The interiors of the left and right of the panel also consist of eco-friendly material that totally reflects wavelengths of EM radiations from 100,000 nm to 300 nm. The bottom of the panel is where the flame is emitted. The length of the flame is almost as long as the bottom of the panel. The top of the panel is where hot gases from the combustion escape – this is the exhaust and is as long as the flame. The material on the front of this heater has a low-enough heat conduction coefficient that it remains perceptibly cool even though it allows thermal radiation to escape outward.
There are two pipes attaches to the bottom of this heater. One carries the fuel, while the other carries a stoichiometric amount of oxygen.
This infrared heater is air-tight prior to combustion. Also, prior to combustion, the only gas present in the heater is helium. Helium is an easy-to-transport, non-reactive gas. There is a sufficient amount of helium [but not more] such that the air pressure inside the heater equates to the air pressure outside the heater – this is to prevent any damage to the heating panel caused by pressure differences. Just before ignition of the fuel, the correct amount of helium is removed such that the high-temperature of the flame does not raise the internal air pressure to the point of damage. Also, the ignition is smooth and completely non-explosive. Just prior to the ignition, an adequate amount of fuel and oxygen are discharged into the heater in the slow, smooth, continuous manner. Now, when the amount of fuel [and stoichiometric amount of oxygen] is enough for ignition and self- sustaining combustion, an electric spark is discharged which causes the fuel to catch fire. The amount of flame is adjustable in terms of height and width – however the length is constant. At the lowest setting there is just enough flame for the blue to be visible. At the highest setting the flame nearly fills up the entire heating panel.
I’m thinking of two applications for this radiant heater:
1. Use mild versions of the heater in cold parts of the world in outdoor public places to keep citizens warm – such as in the bus stops in Northern Europe, where the climate is often cold and wet.
2. More intense versions of this heater can be used to cook food. Think charred pork that’s bloody red on the inside.
Thanks,
Green Xenon
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"GreenXenon" wrote in message
Hi:
I’m thinking of hypothetical purely-natural gas fired radiant heater in which the significant emitter of thermal radiation is the flame itself.
The fuel is purely-natural gas. By “purely natural”, I mean it is the raw, unprocessed, and unrefined natural gas straight from the marshes. In terms of oxidant/fuel ratio, the flame is stoichiometric. Oxygen [O2] is the only oxidant to burn the fuel.
Each and every molecule of the fuel is fully-oxidized by the oxygen but without there being any excess of oxygen.
There are 6 sides to this radiant heater. Left, right, back, front, up, and down. The height of the left, right, front and back are the same. The top and bottom are shorter in length than the heights of the aforementioned. However, the top and bottom are of the same width as the widths of the left and right. The front of the heater is what faces the object intended to be heated. The front consists of eco- friendly material that is completely transparent to all EM radiation from 100,000 nm to 300 nm. The interior of the back of the heater consists of eco-friendly material that completely reflects all wavelengths of EM radiation from 100,000 nm to 300 nm. The interiors of the left and right of the panel also consist of eco-friendly material that totally reflects wavelengths of EM radiations from 100,000 nm to 300 nm. The bottom of the panel is where the flame is emitted. The length of the flame is almost as long as the bottom of the panel. The top of the panel is where hot gases from the combustion escape – this is the exhaust and is as long as the flame. The material on the front of this heater has a low-enough heat conduction coefficient that it remains perceptibly cool even though it allows thermal radiation to escape outward.
There are two pipes attaches to the bottom of this heater. One carries the fuel, while the other carries a stoichiometric amount of oxygen.
This infrared heater is air-tight prior to combustion. Also, prior to combustion, the only gas present in the heater is helium. Helium is an easy-to-transport, non-reactive gas. There is a sufficient amount of helium [but not more] such that the air pressure inside the heater equates to the air pressure outside the heater – this is to prevent any damage to the heating panel caused by pressure differences. Just before ignition of the fuel, the correct amount of helium is removed such that the high-temperature of the flame does not raise the internal air pressure to the point of damage. Also, the ignition is smooth and completely non-explosive. Just prior to the ignition, an adequate amount of fuel and oxygen are discharged into the heater in the slow, smooth, continuous manner. Now, when the amount of fuel [and stoichiometric amount of oxygen] is enough for ignition and self- sustaining combustion, an electric spark is discharged which causes the fuel to catch fire. The amount of flame is adjustable in terms of height and width – however the length is constant. At the lowest setting there is just enough flame for the blue to be visible. At the highest setting the flame nearly fills up the entire heating panel.
I’m thinking of two applications for this radiant heater:
1. Use mild versions of the heater in cold parts of the world in outdoor public places to keep citizens warm – such as in the bus stops in Northern Europe, where the climate is often cold and wet.
2. More intense versions of this heater can be used to cook food. Think charred pork that’s bloody red on the inside.
Thanks,
Green Xenon
PUT THE CRACK PIPE DOWN.
THANKS
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What would be the drawbacks of this device?
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Well, to start with, putting in <exactly> the right amount of oxygen will lead to excessive exhaust of unburned gas. How long do you think the last few lonely molecules of gas will have to wander around looking for the last few molecules of oxygen, before sweeping up the chimney? Going to put a catalytic converter in there too?
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Natural gas is methane that has had an odorant added.
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On Jan 23, 5:22 pm, "Stormin Mormon"

Here's the problem with your approach to theory. You only look at the evidence that supports your stance, but really these add little of value. It is much more efficient to look for contrary evidence.
And I can provide some.
My farts do NOT stink.
Case closed.
At this point it is sufficient to gracefully admit I am rightt. Congratulating me on my brilliance is optional.
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wrote:

    But they do smell like shit.
    You might not consider that a 'stink', I dunno.

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