outside condenser: which pipes get insulated

For a central residential AC system, for the two copper pipes going to the outside condenser unit (outflow/inflow), which copper pipe(s) should the insulation be placed around?
And what purpose does the insulation play in the AC system's operation?
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Ojas wrote:

    The insulation should be placed around the larger copper tube. Its purpose is to prevent condensation from forming around that tube since it will be cooler than the surrounding air. If you fail to do so, the water dripping from it (condensation) might damage wood or plaster in the vicinity of the tube.

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Are you sure that's the reason or merely an additional welcome bonus?
Cheers
Richard
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The form of this sentence is incorrect. In addition, it contains several factual errors.
Actually, there's usually between 7 and 10 copper pipes between the the air handler and the outdoor unit. Most of them are used for communications between these pieces of equipment. Some of them must be insulated, and the remainder can be insulated.

Didn't you learn in English that you don't start a sentence with "and"?
Stick to playing with stucco and paint. It's not as likely to cause permanent damage to you.
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Usually the smaller line gets insulated with R-38 inside. This keeps the heat in the pipe so it can be carried outside and not cause any undue strain on your cooling system inside. Make sure you do NOT insulate the small line outside.....inside only. On the outside you need to insulate the big line. Make sure you give the outside unit a good acid washing and a light sanding with a #150 grit belt sander to increase heat transfer from the condenser coil. Bubba
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The big pipe is marked outflow: from the house to the unit.
The little pipe is marked inflow: from the unit to the house.
And so the heated gas is sent to the outside unit using the big pipe (3/4" diameter copper). The outside unit removes the heat. And then what is sent into the house should be a liquid, which is why the pipe is smaller.
Is that correct?
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Yes except, the liquid is sent through the smaller pipe because ........can you imaging all the noise that much liquid would make sending it through a larger pipe? Thats why the small line is insulated. To keep down all the rushing liquid noise. Sometimes, if it gets to noisy you can put a flow control valve in the line and throttle it down to dampen the liquid rush noise. Bubba
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Bubba posted for all of us...

all that gas passing noise.
--
Tekkie Don\'t bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.

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Ojas posted for all of us...

--
Tekkie Don\'t bother to thank me, I do this as a public service.

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With furnaces, we use the term "supply" and "return". So, the one pipe supplies the evaporator (outflow, our out from the unit) and the other one returns the refrigerant to the compressor. So, I think they are labelled backwards.
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.

"Ojas" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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The only things that's backwards is your logic.
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On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 22:09:20 -0400, "Stormin Mormon \\(on backup

WE?? Who the hell is "we" Stormy, you hack? You still carrying that mouse around in your pocket or is it shoved up your ass? Bubba

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The round one

Its magic
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The inflow gets insulated.
Helps keep the system from picking up unwanted heat. Reduces water condensaton on suction line.
--

Christopher A. Young
.
.

"Ojas" < snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com> wrote in message
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He said the little pipe was labeled inflow, RETARD!!!
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Hi Ojas You have lot different answers some are correct but the way are put you really can tell if are jokers or serious answers, first your lager pipe/tubing is suction to compressor which is ideal to be insulated because you don't want water drips from sweating on the line and on the long runs it also saves some energy which makes unit little more efficient but not much that you will be able to see or measure. The smaller line is your liquid line which carries liquid to your cooling coil inside your house (remember cooling takes place when liquid expand from liquid form in to gas)in any case this line does not need to be insulated unless again line is long and exposed to sun or is going through area where temperature is higher then outside the location of condenser, so in 99% of installations you will not see this small line insulated but yes if you whish it will not hurt the system if it is insulated but you may benefit some as I said it all depend on your setup and location. Tony www.cas-environ.com

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Damn, I thought it had something to do with superheat...
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