Just when you think you've seen it all...

Ran across a 20 ton Byrant LP RTU today that is data tagged at 3.2" wc on the manifold and verified by the manufacture as such. That's a first for me. Every other piece of LP equipment I've ever seen runs 10" wc on the manifold.
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I always check the tags... as anything's possible. I've seen water heaters with low 9" and heating units up to 11". If I recall correctly, the Lennox Pulse was an unusual number.
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Yea if memory serves, the NG G21 was 2"wc and LP was 9"wc. I seem to remember the first generation was higher.
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"Unusual"?? hehe. That's quite an understatement. That furnace was undoubtedly the strangest machine ever. And the "flapper". Now that was a piece of artwork. And then the ol water pressure test to check for heat exchanger leaks. Now that was some engineering work. POS. Gotta love ol "Dave". Bubba
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Was at a house today with a Pulse... Manifold pressure for Nat is 2" while LP was to be set at 9"
Another POS design is the Syder General GUA... pressurized heat exchanger...
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Tempstar happens to be getting on my nerves a bit too. Installed a 2.5 ton 12 Seer heat pump back in 2005 for my cousin. Working fine till last week. Found the outdoor expansion valve had rubbed a hole in the cap bulb line so the bulb lost its charge. No valve in stock at my Tempstar dealer (They have 8 diff wholesale houses in 3 states. Had to get it from the factory. It comes so I go do the job. About 5 hrs for a damn bulb change. A big part of that was getting that damn frozen refrigerant out of the unit at 9 in the morning on a 20 degree day. Had a cube heater, hand held propane torch and covered the top of the unit to warm it up. Anyways, changed it out, press tested, evacuated (changed the bi-flo drier in the outdoor unit), weighed in the charge and turned it on. Compressor sounded a bit funny and I watched the suction gauge pump all the way down to zero!! Freaking garbage new exp valve from the factory! I was a little leary because when I got the new valve out of the box it looked rather tarnished and not shiney new copper and brass. Looked at the date code. It TOO was a 2005 new expansion valve. Its one with the check built into the valve, non bleed with the external eq line. What a crock of chit! Ordered the new valve again. Wonder what I'll get this time? Bubba
It sure would be nice to build units with bypasses and shut off valves around the exp valve so when they crap out on you, just valve it off, unbolt or unsweat, pop in the new, a quick evac on the valve and a cpl inches of tubing and away you go again. I know it would be more expensive to build but hell, around here the require new boilers to be installed with valves on almost every piece on the unit to avoid draining the system. Maybe Ohamma will require that. hahahaha
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wrote:

Valves only work if you exercise them once in a while which is something that usually isn't done. I've seen a lot of new butterfly and ball valves not hold worth a damn after a few years. I've also seen quite a few gate valves fail because the stems to the gate break when you try and valve them off.
I had to replace some HW valves in an old church last week that wouldn't shut off completely and the only valves in the loop were at the boiler. Took all day to replace four angle valves with a union outlet because of it. Purging the air was a real bitch. I replaced the coin vents on the baseboard with some #67 auto vents to help take care of any remaining air which worked out fine. Systems with air separators are a lot easier to deal with.
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3.2" seems low, but is not unusual. Since lots of gas lines "out East" are ancient many run on very low pressure. Not long ago, (w/in 15 yrs) Boston & Chicago still had gas mains made of wood, 14" WC gas pressure was all that could be delivered at the street. Bring that into a building, & run it through a meter, & 7" was the max they'd "guarantee delivered" 7" WC pressure out from the meter, & a reasonable pipe TEL (total equivalent length), common practice meant most equipment was sized to operate on a standard loss of 50% from the meter... hence, 3.5" With high pressure gas out West (80 psi at the street) it does seem "small"
goodluck geothermaljones

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On Wed, 21 Jan 2009 21:35:38 -0600, "geothermaljones"
This is propane, you know LP gas..

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I'm assuming Bryant built it for worst case & offered up a $10-20.00 kit for LP-NG swap. Sure would lower production costs.
Maybe they built it to operate in sub zero temp zones... Propane pressure drops as the temps drop below zero, & has none at all if it's below it's -44dF boiling point. Not common, but well above my states low temp record... (-60dF in Tower, MN 1996) Add to that the pressures of tanks near empty, tank heaters are common, & many are underground.
But, I could be wrong...
geothermaljones

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On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 18:38:08 -0600, "geothermaljones"

Yea there was a LP kit installed.

I was reading not long ago about the temp in Tok AK of -78. They were saying at those temps the brake fluid would freeze in cars and truck. Can you imagine living in those temps? Brrrrrrr.

Some LP kits include a LP switch to be installed in the supply line to shut off the furnace when the pressure gets low to prevent sooting.

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On Thu, 22 Jan 2009 18:38:08 -0600, "geothermaljones"

Yea there was a LP kit installed.

I was reading not long ago about the temp in Tok AK of -78. They were saying at those temps the brake fluid would freeze in cars and truck. Can you imagine living in those temps? Brrrrrrr.

Some LP kits include a LP switch to be installed in the supply line to shut off the furnace when the pressure gets low to prevent sooting.

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