Tree growing through bushes!

Hello,
I've been tidying the garden and part of this has been giving the hedges and bushes a final cut.
I've found a couple of the attached trees (?) growing through bushes. Can anyone tell me what they are and how best to get rid of them? I've cut them back to the ground, but by looking at one of them, it has been chopped down in the past.
They're not a nuisance but I am intrigued as to what they are!
Thanks in advance!
Stewart
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strqnter


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On Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:35:29 +0200, strqnter

Can't ID it but it's small, dig it out by its roots... plant it elsewhere or toss it.
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Reminds me of that quiz show. Can you name this tune in one note? If you really want an ID, you need to give more hints, overall tree shape, growing habit, flowers, clearer shots on the leaves, location.
As Brooklyn said, dig it out. Otherwise, you'll have to clip it off for years before it gives up the ghost. If you can't dig it out (being inside a hedge), you can put Roundup on it while it's growing. Won't hurt the hedge if you only get the Roundup on the leaves.
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Dan Espen

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On 9/30/2014 11:35 AM, strqnter wrote:

Can't tell you what it is, but as other posters have mentioned, digging it out is the best solution. However, if that turns out to be too difficult a task, there is a simpler way to get rid of it. First, cut the tree down as close to the ground as reasonably possible. Next, find a sturdy water- and light-proof container, such as a metal can or a ceramic pot. Select one large enough to be a couple of inches wider than the stump when the container is turned upside down over the stump. Place the container over the stump, set a rock or brick atop the container. The stump will resprout, but the container will block light from getting to it, and the brick will keep the sprouts from pushing the container off the stump. Given enough time (around here, we keep the container on for a year) the stump will die. At that point you can remove the container. The stump can be left in place, or, once it's decayed enough to be easily removed, you can dig it out.
The area I live in has a major problem with invasive buckthorn, and this is the simpler approach we use to to deal with persistent specimens found in garden beds and borders.
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