The name of Azalea is Coral Bells

Anyone know of this variety of azaleas? Its the hardy type in a 10" container facing southwest. I try to keep most of it in the shade of a yew shrub. It gave me new growth this summer and was wondering if I would get any blook this fall. If not, how should I treat it? Fertilize, bring indoors for the winter?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Wishy13764) wrote:

"Coral Bells" is a Kurume evergreen dwarf azalea, one of the first varieties ever introduced from Japan to the United States.

It gave

this fall.

Most of this was already answered for you the first time you asked -- if you check your original query you'll see good stuff on fertilizing from Stephen. Essentially you shouldn't fertilize until late winter or early spring, then optionally a second time after it stops blooming, probably at the end of April. It should be an low-nitrogen fertilizer that will say on the box that it is acidic for evergreens or for rhododendrons & camellias.
Also as already answered, it blooms once a year, in spring. Long bloom times & rebloom is NOT one the bonuses of azaleas & rhodies.
A ten inch pot is too small for an azalea. It will never be very tall (takes years & years to reach two feet of hieght), but can spread rather more swiftly to three or four feet wide. It would require at minimum a two-foot-wide shallow pot, but would do best if you could put it in the ground.
-paghat the ratgirl
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"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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Most of this was already answered for you the first time you asked -- if you check your original query you'll see good stuff on fertilizing from Stephen. Essentially you shouldn't fertilize until late winter or early spring, then optionally a second time after it stops blooming, probably at the end of April. It should be an low-nitrogen fertilizer that will say on the box that it is acidic for evergreens or for rhododendrons & camellias.
True, but if you recall in my first post, I did not know the name of the plant, so that is why I entered in the subject title as it is, hopeing someone like yourself, would be more enlighten of what plant we were actually talking about.
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