Texas Gardens

Hi, I live in Sanantonio Texas. I have planted a garden for the first time in my life. Everything seems to be growing well. My question is, will my plants reproduce fruit/vegetables all summer into the fall, or will some die and I will need to plant another crop in the late summer. I have planted:
beans peas cucumbers zucchini squash tomatoes corn on the cob broccoli
Thanks, Rodger
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snipped-for-privacy@nospamplease.net wrote:

You live there and don't know how to write the name of your city correctly?
Something smells fishy.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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Nothing fishy. Just a serious question. I actually live in the greater Northeast San Antonio. A small city called Schertz. Near Randolph Air base.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospamplease.net wrote:

They are all annuals and will all die in the fall. I can't think of any perennial vegetables.
If you live in Schertz then you don't live in San Antonio.
I live in Shoreline and our southern city limit abuts Seattles northern city limit but I don't live in greater North Seattle I live in Shoreline.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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Schertz is considered to be part of the greater NE San Antonio region. In fact, San Antonio ( down town River walk) is 15 miles from my house.

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On Fri, 20 May 2005 22:28:29 GMT, "Travis"

you post answers with little knowledge or clarity, that's VERY fishy!
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snipped-for-privacy@nospamplease.net wrote:

Is there a garden club or horticultural society in San Antonio? What about the Texas State Agriculture Department? Both are good sources for the information you seek. If you join the club, you'll also make good friends. Your local library will also have useful books - just ask. Librarians may not know the answers, but they are very good at helping you find them. (Plug - my niece is a librarian in Midland MI).
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San Antonio has garden clubs up the wazoo & the point of first contact would be the San Antonio Botanical Garden and the adjacent San Antonia Garden Center.
-paghat the ratgirl
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Relax,
Some of these people get all bent out of shape about nothing. I live in Austin your neighbor to the North. Most serious gardeners in this area plan on having at lease 3 if not 4 gardens. I have a garden for each of the 4 seasons and so can you. Once plants become tired or diseased you replace them with new ones that will be complemented by the expected weather. Since you live in San Antonio, you will have only a few really cold days. Buy a gardening book about Texas gardening and I'm sure you will find out all you need to know. Gardening is not ROCKET SCIENCE. Don't be afraid to experiment and fail. Even the most experienced gardeners sometimes don't do the right thing.
Have Fun Jim
wrote:

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Jim Marrs wrote: [...] Even the most experienced gardeners sometimes don't do the right

And don't I know it!
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True - and some of them won't admit it, either! ;->
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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since no one replied to you... assuming no disease (eg, the squash and cukes may get borer, or mildew, or both), the broccoli and peas will certainly stop in the summer. The corn is a one time thing. The beans, it depends. string beans keep producing for a long time, but shelling beans come all at once. indeterminate (tall) tomatoes should keep producing, while determinate (bush) may come all at once. cukes and squash should continue producing into the fall. At any rate expect some slowdown, even for continuously producing crops, after the first two months of harvest.
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Thanks for the tips. You have been very helpful. Much different that little child molester who said I smell like fish. SOB should come to Texas so we can teach him some civility. He is probably just a troll anyway, looking for your boys on the net.
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if I may give you one more tip... broccoli and peas are winter vegetables for San Antonio. They will take frost and keep on growing when the weather is milder. They both suffer above 80F. In the summer, it is best if you stick to heat tolerant veggies (okra and watermelon, and cowpeas).
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snipped-for-privacy@nospamplease.net says... :) Hi, I live in Sanantonio Texas. I have planted a garden for the first :) time in my life. Everything seems to be growing well. My question is, :) will my plants reproduce fruit/vegetables all summer into the fall, or :) will some die and I will need to plant another crop in the late :) summer. I have planted: :) :) beans
beans will bear well into summer ..keep picking the pods, they will start thinning out mid Summer so a fall crop will be good to have :) peas peas do better in Spring
:) cucumbers will produce into summer..may get a more bitter taste when real hot, insect/disease may kill out plants into summer
:) zucchini squash will produce when hot, but later in summer will fall victim to a couple of pests
:) tomatoes when it gets real hot they will not produce well..may have to baby them through end of summer, but will start to produce again..better crop by putting out new plants end of July
:) corn on the cob make sure they are grouped tightly so that they will pollinate..will get your best ears early summer
:) broccoli I always thought of it as a cool weather crop..gotten best crops in fall plantings :) :) Thanks, :) Rodger :)
--
Lar

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I live in Austin and in my experience things do go dormant during summers. Tomatoes have been kept alive to start producing again in the fall, but the only variety I've had this happen with are the 'Roma' tomatoes. 'Sweet Million' cherry or grape tomatoes also produce all summer through to frost. Most other things are finished by July 1. A second garden can be started then for the fall and in September another one for broccoli, lettuce, spinach, turnips, leeks, garlic, etc.
It's said we have two short growing seasons in Texas (most parts). That is accurate, but a good gardener can have something to harvest all year. You are firmly in USDA Zone 9a in San Antonio. Do a search on www.google.com for tons more information.
If it's herbs you want to grow, Gwen Barclay and Madeline Hill have a good book called "Southern Herbs."
On Fri, 20 May 2005 15:19:09 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@nospamplease.net opined:

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