Stole some fertiliser yesterday

I went round to a work mates yesterday & helped him clean out his shed. I took a few things he didn't want, including a sack of fertiliser. "Thanks" was what he told me as I walked away with the sack of fertiliser. Mind you, he thought the sack simply contained leaves. He didn't realise I was walking away with the nutrients from his garden.
rob
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George.com wrote:

Are you boasting or confessing?
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On 1/16/08 7:22 AM, in article ua2dnRa5tZlNaBDanZ2dnUVZ snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net,

Sounds like both to me!
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ironising, if there is such a word. My mate wouldn't want me taking a bag of fertiliser which he will spread on his garden but is happy to dispose of a sack of leaves that are the yield from the fertiliser he spread. Admittedly the leaves don't hold many nutrients however he wouldn't chuck out a load of lawn fertiliser but would throw away lawn clippings. Taking peoples leaves or lawn clippings is nutrient theft by stealth.
rob
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Oh, really, leaves can contain a nutrient but it cannot be asorbed by the plants. It would be used by soil micros.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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walking away with fertilizer.
Food is a substance that provides and energy source, mostly. Nutrient is a substance that provides an energy source, elements, and other substances essential for life, in types and amounts that can provide a healthy life. Fertilizer is a substance that provides elements, as salts mostly, or in bonded forms, that require microorganisms to alter to forms that can be absorbed or taken in by plants. They are not absorbing in the sense of a Bounty paper towel.
Most plants cannot absorb a nutrient as defined in the latter.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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John, please stop embarrassing those dwindling few of us who respect your work. You don't need to jump in every time a word isn't used to your satisfaction. I call the local blue colored jay a bluejay. It isn't but everybody here knows what I'm talking about, however when I use it on the net, the Audubon groupies throw the book at me. It is a western scrub jay, which in the future I will refer to as a blue jay, not to be confused with a bluejay. You, however, seem to have ventured out onto thinner ice with your own definitions.

My desktop dictionary defines
(1) nutrient as a substance that provides nourishment essential for growth and the maintenance of life : fish is a source of many important nutrients, including protein, vitamins, and minerals.
ORIGIN mid 17th cent.: from Latin nutrient- nourishing, from the verb nutrire,
and
(2) fertilizer a chemical or natural substance added to soil or land to increase its fertility.
Furthermore, from Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fertilizer
Compounds given to plants to promote growth; they are usually applied either through the soil, for uptake by plant roots, or by foliar feeding, for uptake through leaves. Fertilizers can be organic (composed of organic matter), or inorganic (made of simple, inorganic chemicals or minerals). They can be naturally occurring compounds such as peat or mineral deposits, or manufactured through natural processes (such as composting) or chemical processes (such as the Haber process).
Fertilizers typically (re: not always) provide, in varying proportions, the three major plant nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium), the secondary plant nutrients (calcium, sulfur, magnesium), and sometimes trace elements (or micronutrients) with a role in plant nutrition: boron, chlorine, manganese, iron, zinc, copper, and molybdenum.
(1) A nutrient nurtures and
(2) a fertilizer makes fertile.

So the point is John, that we knew what George.com was talking about and it didn't need clarification and your post potentially obscured the understanding of what nutrient and fertilizer mean. Next time: google it.
Good product placement though. I hope you get paid;-)
--

Billy

Bush & Cheney, Behind Bars
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Heh - of course it will take a bit of processing in the old compost pile to be usable! :-)
Ted
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Nah, you can still mulch with it and the worms will still thank you.
--

Billy

Bush & Cheney, Behind Bars
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its all free and its all good stuff. Free is good.
rob
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