Shredding & blowing peat moss on lawn?

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Someone was telling me that they can use a shredder-blower to shred peat moss and spray a think layer of it all over your lawn after putting down grass seed, then you water and it helps keep the moisture in and start the seed so it doesn't dry out.
What do they call the blower that can do that and what do they usually cost?
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Mama Bear wrote:

Wouldn't you rather know if it works before you start spending money?
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Warren H.

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I've been told it can work. But go ahead. What is it, and can it work?
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wrote :

peat moss can be expensive, it certainly is for the stuff you buy for hanging baskets anyway, and may not be environmentally sustainable if large amounts are harvested.
As an alternative, I used frost cloth. I prepared the soil, rakes it, threw on the seed, raked it in to the top soil, watered and staked down some frost cloth across the top. The cloth kept the direct sun off and moisture in and reduced the amount of watering I needed to do. I checked it a few times a day and put the sprinkler on when the soil was starting to dry out. After a few days the grass started to come through and I pulled the cloth back to let the sun in. If not frost cloth maybe light sail cloth or old hessian sacking. It should not be too heavy and cumbersome but not too porous either.
rob
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wrote :

Peat moss also dries out very quickly when exposed to air. Then, two things happen: First, it acts like a sponge and sucks moisture out of adjacent materials, like your soil. This assumes it remains in place, which is probably won't if it's been pulverized and there's any wind. The only correct way to use peat moss on a lawn is to work it into the soil, not just put it on top.
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I'm thinking of the big bales of it that they sell for planting. It's about $4 something for a big square of it.

I don't know what frost cloth is, but suspect it would be too expensive to cover an 8000 sq ft lot with it.

Can someone please answer my original question, without going off on tangents like this? Thanks.
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Mama Bear wrote:

Why do you think anyone knows where you can get a blower shredder that will do that? If none of us thinks it's a good idea, why would we have ever shopped for one? You're not getting a straight answer because your original message implied that you weren't interested in whether the idea worked, but just on how to carry-out the idea even if it is a dumb idea. You came here with your mind made up.
As Doug noted, the shredded peat moss is going to very quickly dry-out. It's either going to just blow away, or it's going to wick-away water that otherwise could be going to good use. Think about it. Just how would loose peat moss help do anything useful? It's a horrible waste of a natural resource that's being depleted fast enough. As gardeners, even armature gardeners, we should be stewards of the Earth. Wasting peat moss on some scheme that has no benefit is not a good idea. And using a power tool of some sort -- possibly even a gas-powered tool -- is even worse.
In an earlier message you said, "I've been told it can work." Well, now you've been told that it doesn't work more than once. I guess if you're prone to go off and do things -- along with spending money to buy stuff to do those things -- without any research just because you've "been told it can work", this should be more than enough to change your mind.
It's a dumb idea. But if you really still want to go ahead and do it, then you'll just have to do your own shopping. I know I've got better things to do than shop for you.
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Not only that, but if the lawn were mowed correctly (leaving clippings in place, mowing as high as possible except for the last cutting before winter), there will be plenty of organic matter deposited on the lawn. Peat moss should be saved for garden areas, and used only if the soil is utterly hideous.
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Nobody else knows where to buy one, either. Imagine trying to blow feathers onto your lawn, or flour. That's what it would be like to try and blow peat moss onto the lawn.

The responses became sarcastic when the OP decided she didn't like the answers, and only wanted to hear "yes", when in fact, the answer is "no". If you don't have an open mind when you ask questions, then don't ask.
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(Amazon.com product link shortened)? v=glance&n"8013
Toro 51598 Ultra Blower
# Variable air control # 225-miles-per-hour maximum air force will clear just about any lawn # Metal impeller for efficient mulching # Reduces 16 bags of leaves to 1

http://www.greengate.ca/lawns_sod /
Seeding Steps
* Spread grass seed using a drop spreader at the amount per square foot indicated on the package. Different varieties have different ratios. Try setting the spreader at half this rate and apply the seed in two passes at right angles to each other. * Rake in lightly. * After seeding apply a thin layer of peat moss over the entire area. This helps retain moisture and holds the seed to ensure a quality product.

I'd like to know how I can do something, not how I can't. Crapping all over anything anyone wants to do, is not helpful. It looks like usenet is a useless wasteland of frustrated hourly workers who take out their frustrations by flaming anything that anyone posts.
Thanks a hell of a lot.
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This entire time I thought you were going to use something like a chipper/shredder to launch the peat moss everywhere. I had no idea you were going to try and use a leaf blower to spread the stuff around.
Please, please, please, get someone to make a video of you using the leaf blower.
For what it's worth, in the spring time, I just buy a few bags of composted steer manure and spread that around with a rake.
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That advice is incorrect.

If you want to know how to plant a new lawn, then that's the question you should ask. You would've gotten plenty of positive and useful feedback. But, you DID NOT ask that question. This is what I saw in your first post, with regard to "blowing peat moss on lawn":
"I've been told it can work. But go ahead. What is it, and can it work?"
Are those your words?
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Andrew Ostrander wrote:

I take it that you haven't tried this, either, so your word carries no more weight than anyone else here. (Actually less, since you haven't built any credibility yet.)
So why do you think that peat pots partially burried wick water out of the ground?
It's because the peat is exposed to the air. Then the peat touching the ground wicks water away to replace what is being dried out by the air. Spreading peat on top of the ground will have the same effect. Peat, in order to retain moisture, cannot be exposed to the air. Peat exposed to air will dry out, and will then grab any moisuture it can. The peat pot partially exposed is very much the same as shredded peat laying on the surface in this regard.
Also, if you shred peat, and let it dry out, it will be very light. So yes, some of it will blow away.

There are plenty of old wives tales out there. This one makes sense only if the depth of your thinking goes one level. (Peat wants to hold water, so it must hold water close to the seeds if I spread it on top of them.) If one isn't capable of thinking one step further, then it makes sense to them, and they'll be puzzeled at why they have to water so much more than the guy who though ahead and didn't spread peat on top of soil.

Not only don't you know anything about peat, you don't know what sarcasm is, either.
What do you think our motivation is? Our motivation is to stop someone from doing something stupid and wasteful based on half-baked ideas.
Peat laying on top of soil will dry out. The only way it will not dry out is if you water *more* than you would if it wasn't there.
If you really want to use peat to retain moisture, you need to work it into the soil so it's not exposed to the air. You can't just shred it, and blow it. Give it some real thought, and you'll see that this is not a position of ignorance. Thinking the peat laying on top of the soil does any good is a position of ignorance.
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Thank you.

I've since found out that Toro makes shredder blowers for around $80.

Exactly. We have a sprinkler system. Now maybe we don't even need the peat moss, and we could just turn the sprinklers on a few times a day to keep the soil moist. The problem last year was that we didnt get the new sprinkler system installed until the weather was already warm and the weeds took over this new lot. we had to battle them. Now we have about 50% grass after the battle of last year and want to get 100% grass by this year.

That's what I was thinking.

Ask a simple question on usenet and everyone is an expert, even when they don't know what they're talking about.
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wrote :

it's for shredding leaves for compost, not blowing peat moss on the lawn. it would not do what you wanted. it would make holes where the discharge chute is. we have a chipper/shredder & use a tarp under the discharge chute.

you really should have done your seeding in the fall. grass grows better when fall seeded. as you found last year, when you spring seed you get a lot of weeds. i would seed now with a blend of something fast growing (like annual rye) & then reseed again in the fall with more perennial turfgrasses for your area. just don't expect your lawn to look great for another couple years. 8000 sq.ft. of lawn just sounds like way too much bother, but that's me... and i have cute llama lawnmowers. lee
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In order for her to do that, she would've had to listen to people who she calls "experts". But, in an earlier message, she said disdainful things about "experts". Maybe she should tell us what authorities she DOES trust, and how she decides who to listen to.
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As peat moss dries, it sometimes forms a crust which can be difficult for seed to penetrate. This is why it's supposed to be mixed into the soil. I have a question. Have you ever actually handled peat moss that's been broken down from chunks into a powdery state? I mean....have you touched it with your hands, especially when it's dry?

I have another question. Two, actually. No...wait. Three.
1) Tell me how long I've been gardening and how many dozens of books I've read on the subject.
2) How long have you been gardening and how many books you've read on the subject.
3) You said "everyone is an expert". When you asked your original question, did you want advice from someone who was NOT an expert? If so, why didn't you ask anyone who knew what they were talking about to please refrain from answering?
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broken
question,
from
Your claims here that you are speaking from authority make you sound like a midaeval church official who denied that heavy bodies fall as fast as light ones. You have never tried this, or spoken with anyone who has. Experiment is a lot more conclusive than theory.
As for wicking, if peat is mixed into soil many pieces of peat undoubtedly stick out a bit. Yet the peat-soil mix is not dried out by any wicking effect. It is, in fact, a recommended mix for starting sod where peat is cheap. Yes, I have handled peat. I have also tossed handfuls of it onto my garden and seen them in the same spot months later, having failed to notice your opinion and blow away. (and yes, that's sarcasm.)
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"tried this" - I assume you're talking about mechanically launching peat moss. That's correct - I haven't seen it done. Let me ask you something: If you see 1000 landscapers create new lawns, and NONE of them "blow" peat moss onto the surface, does that tell you anything? Let's assume also that 10% of these people are not private business people, but work for municipalities, which often have plenty of money for the latest equipment.
Why do you suppose you and I haven't seen this launching idea done with peat moss?

I noticed that the OP has now said that the person who suggested the idea to her in the first place might not be so reliable. Maybe she'll explain why later today.
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If
moss
of
peat
I expect blowing on peat moss is not the most cost-effective way to establish a new lawn in most situations. But the OP did not ask how to establish a new lawn, she asked where to buy a tool, and in response she got general advice. This advice was presented as factual but it was not based on experience, and I did not and do not agree with the advice. I reproduce it here:
< Peat moss also dries out very quickly when exposed to air. Then, two things < happen: First, it acts like a sponge and sucks moisture out of adjacent < materials, like your soil. This assumes it remains in place, which is < probably won't if it's been pulverized and there's any wind. The only < correct way to use peat moss on a lawn is to work it into the soil, not just < put it on top.
I will also point out that she is not starting a new lawn but trying to fill in an existing lawn, so comparisons with starting new lawns are not very informative.
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