Please help ID trees/shrubs, and a cute dog.

we live in the mid-south (the climate zone covers north mississippi, southwest/central TN); soil is solid clay (hard, reddish color); builder put black top soils on it.
1) neighbor's dog; friendly to me, but like to chase cars!
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5445.JPG
2) this tree faces the west and doesn't look very healthy.
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5448.jpg
leaves close-up:
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5449.JPG
3) what are the plants in the lower left and upper right, separately?
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5450.JPG
4) the root looks like ginger:
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5451.JPG
5) pretty, with waxy leaves; dark green, very healthy:
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5452.jpg
leaves, flowers, fruits closeup:
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5453.JPG
6) i think this is maple; but what kind? i did some research and exclude "florida maple", although florida maple is native to where i live and popular. leaves:
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5454.JPG
balk:
http://216.119.177.53/help2ID/DSC_5455.jpg
thanks a lot.
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Great dog - the short hair makes it easy to tape a pistol target onto it. And, they're fast, so hitting the target's a real challenge.

Those are irises. Nice, healthy looking roots, too.
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OK; # 6 could be sycamore; they have identical leaf patterns.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hosta left, Aucuba japonica right.

Iris, possibly even winter iris if that is recent new foliage.

Fruits shmoots. Its a camellia with buds, likely C. sasanqua, double-pink, blooms typically September through November.
-paghat the ratgirl
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes

Looks like Hosta and Aucuba.

Identified as Iris elsethread.

Camellia
Possibly Acer rubrum or Acer saccharum. (It's not Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore) as possibly suggested elsethread.)

--
Stewart Robert Hinsley

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We may be neighbors. I am in North Shelby county which is in Hardiness Zone 7a. Zone 7b may be near the Mississippi-Tennessee border. Perhaps more or at least equally important than hardiness is our location in Heat Zone 8. Our hot, humid weather without a nightly cool down is a killer to many plants.
So.... Photo 1 = nice dog
Photo 2 = Dogwood, probably Cornus florida. Dogwoods struggle here because of the Heat Zone. The same tree in Knoxville, Tennessee or Greenville, South Carolina with Hardiness Zone 7a will thrive. Their Heat Zone is a cool 7. Planting facing the hot afternoon sun is not the best location. Shade from the midday sun would be better. Your dogwood looks OK for this time of year in our area. Long-term care is to water well for 2 or 3 years to develop an extensive root system. Once established they will handle our climate. Dogwoods here are also easy to kill by too much water. Good drainage is important. Allow the soil to dry to just slightly moist between waterings. You didn't say how deep the black topsoil is over the clay. Digging a hole in clay collects the water and can drown the plant. The hole should be at least 3 times wider than the plant rootball. Plants here should be planted about 6 inches higher than the normal soil height. Plant in a 6 inch mound of soil and keep a 3 inch layer of mulch on it. Dogwoods here are often attacked by tree borers. Look for small holes and apply an insecticide. Scary, isn't it. But the spring flowers are worth the effort.
Photo 3 = Hosta on the left and Aucuba on the right. Both do well here. Most Hosta here do best in full or part shade. Aucuba is a plant for full shade or part shade. I do have some that are doing well in sun.
Photo 4 = Bearded Iris which does well here in sun.
Photo 5 = Camellia in a good spot for it here. This plant is considered marginally hardy but in my 16 years here I have noted some very old specimens that have done well. You will need to do some pruning of the leaders to develop a denser plant. Prune immediately after flowering stops. As it is now it will soon be above your house.
Photo 6 = It is a maple and probably Acer saccharum. It will be a very large tree with no problems except for the fall leaf raking. The native Red Maple (Acer rubrum) would have been my first choice. True Sycamore on this side of the pond are called Platanus. Acer psudoplatanus is commonly called Sycamore Maple or Planetree Maple here. But the British have been naming plants long before the unpleasantness of our tea party. I do agree with Stewart. Regards...
writes

Looks like Hosta and Aucuba.

Identified as Iris elsethread.

Camellia
Possibly Acer rubrum or Acer saccharum. (It's not Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore) as possibly suggested elsethread.)

--
Stewart Robert Hinsley




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thank you all for the reply; busy orderingn & installing hardwood floors; i will write more later this week.
nonews wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

6 is Acer rubrum, aka red maple, swamp maple.
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David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com
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