OT: Arsenic in your water?

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wrote:

cleaned up. It got acid rain scaled way back, which was well on the way to destroying much of the Appalachian forests. Same for the Clean Water Act in slowing the pollution of lakes and rivers. They did a lot to get lead out of the environment, and a lot of other good things.

bizarre "new pollutants" like "carbon".... It's really pitiful that they have to be taken to the Supreme Court to be reigned back in to reality.
Grammar police here: REINED (as with horses) not REIGNED as with monarchs.
== Thanks, HB! Although reigned might also apply to EPA these days.
Would welcome more info on "special interests" and EPA ignoring "real pollution problems". Straight request.
=== There's a website that lists all companies with hazardous emissions -- can't remember off hand what it is - probably on the EPA site. If interested, search EPA.gov for "stationary sources", "emissions inventory", etc. If you can find it, let me know and I'll try to find it again.
=== There are hazardous materials landfills all over my area in So Calif that have sat for 50+ years with nothing being done. One near my house sits with water leaching thru layers of petrochemical waste directly adjoining a neighorhood and school. 20 years ago when I moved here, I contacted the state EPA asking about it, and was told it was being studied. It's still being studied today.
=== In a NC an area I'm familiar one plant emits hazardous aromatic vapor emissions that go untouched year after year because the operating family has elected and appointed officials in the county. Another in that same area is a newly built medical waste incinerator that is less than 100 feet upwind from a residential district. When it's burning, the residents have to keep their windows closed.
=== These are just a couple of instances that come to mind. It would be foolish for me to post names and specifics for these. But I'm sure most people reading this know of some type of violation in their own community that is ignored because of some govt official having a personal interest or some businessman having financial influence.
=== I remember in the community where I grew up, there were a lot of teenagers who got cancer. Some died. We lived there only a couple of years, but the kids I hung around with there all died of cancer before they reached 60. Now it's likely too long ago to find out about any carcinogenic sources in that area.
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David E. Ross wrote:

Perhaps my maths are wonky but this looks like 80,000 liters per month (about 20,000 gallons US)
This seems very high. How much goes on the garden and how much is domestic? Do you have domestic water re-use, ie grey water recycling?
David
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On 7/4/2014 4:06 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

You are close. We use an average of 30-31 hundred cubic feet per month, which can be about 22,000 US gallons. Our landscape and household are on a single meter, so I really do not know what portion is used by each.
No, we do not recycle grey water. Our local sewage plant, however, does treat its "product" and sells the reclaimed water at a discount from the price of potable water. This reclaimed water is used to irrigate parks, school play-fields, greenbelts, and golf courses. Safety and the cost of running separate mains into each neighborhood prevents it being used for individual households to irrigate their landscape. Solids remaining after reclaimed water has been treated are composted and given free to anyone who brings their own containers, bins, pickup trucks, etc.
Note that the most water used in California is for agriculture, including thirsty crops such as rice, cotton, and alfalfa.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 5/07/2014 9:06 AM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

It seems high to me too.
We have a 5000 (Imperial) gallon tank on our house which has only run dry twice in the 25 years we've been here after months of no or very little rain. We run water our garden from a 5000 (Imperial) gallon tank on a up slope spot so that it gravity feeds to flush our toilets, water our garden and provide water for the poultry run and a few cattle troughs.
The combined total of these 10,000 Imperial gallons storage would equal 12,009 US gallons and we don't use anywhere near that amount each month even when we get very little or even no rain to fill up the tank whihc is attached to the house. This is our main house supply for showers, kitchen and cleaning.
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On 7/4/2014 10:13 PM, Fran Farmer wrote:

Where are you? How much rain do you get? Do you get it year round?
In the current rain-year (1 October to 30 September), we have had 5.87 inches of rain. The last measurable rain was 69 days ago. No more rain is expected this rain-year. Even in a year without a drought, it is not unusual for 200 days to pass without any measurable rain since most rain falls in December, January, and February. (In only two of the past 11 rain-years did less than half of the annual rainfall occur in those three months.) Thus, in the summer, artificial irrigation is the only source of water for my garden. See my signature block below for a link to a description of my climate.
As a condition on the grading permit for repairing My Hill the second time (see my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_back.html#hill ), I am prohibited from placing anything other than landscaping on it. I especially would not be permitted to place a 5,000 US gallon water tank there; it would weigh 20 tons. I am in an urban community (at least suburban but definitely not rural).
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 7/5/2014 8:15 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

I almost forgot about humidity. In much of southern California, a day with 50% relative humidity is considered very humid. Yesterday was exceptionally humid. During daylight hours, it ranged from 18% to 72%; at noon, it was 33%. When Santa Ana winds blow, we might have several consecutive days when the relative humidity remains below 10% and sometimes might be so low it cannot be measured.
It is important to run sprinklers when wind is minimal and before sunrise. It is also important to mulch and reduce the evaporation of moisture from the soil. Nevertheless, low humidity can still suck so much moisture out of plant leaves that an increase in irrigation becomes necessary even for drought-tolerant plants.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On 6/07/2014 1:15 AM, David E. Ross wrote:

No. That is why I thought your reported usage per month was high. When we don't get rain over our summer, I know how much water we've used by how often we have to pump water to fill the tank so that we can flush the toilet. I tend to think that flushing the toilet is more important than watering the garden and both the garden and the toilet use the same source. That is why I have so many grey plants in my garden - if they aren't as tough as old boots they die and get replaced. That is why I like roses because they fit the old boots category.

Its a very interesting table you've got there. Your rainfall (in inches) seems to be quite variable which of course makes gardneing a challenge. seems to be is about half ours but

Yikes. I think after reading that description of your repair, the cost and the gradient, I'd be seeking to sell up and move. And I can certainly understand why water tank wouldn't be desirable. Imagine that sliding into your family room during a rainy day. It almost makes me feel thankful for my clay and rotten soil and the snakes and the sodding rabbits.......
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On 7/10/2014 12:28 AM, Fran Farmer wrote:

There is no such thing as insurance for earth movement (i.e., My Hill failing again), and grading work to repair such damage is never guaranteed. This was the second time My Hill slipped. If it happens a third time, my wife and I will indeed sell the house "as is".
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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David E. Ross wrote:

I am not talking about the municiple bulk re-cycling but on your own property. Under such systems all but your black water (toilet) goes on to the garden. So if you had a dual flush toilet and/or used the " if it is brown flush it down, if it is yellow let it mellow" idea then all but a tiny part of that 22,000 gallons would end up on the garden.
Would your municiple authority permit this? With the high cost of water the capital cost of the plumbing retrofit may well pay for itself in a few years.
D
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On Saturday, July 5, 2014 3:28:34 PM UTC-7, David Hare-Scott wrote:

Grammar Police here: MIGHT well pay for itself. Speculative. I see it all the time, misused even in "good" books, supposedly copy-edited. Sigh.
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On 6/07/2014 11:09 AM, Higgs Boson wrote:

(snip)
With the high cost of water the

??????
The way David has used 'may' is quite legitimate. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/may-or-might
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Higgs Boson wrote:

You spend so much time bringing up OT material and when, for a change, it drifts on topic you start in about grammar.
Since you obviously have so much time on your hands wouldn't your efforts be better spent in your shed, spare room or loft identifying empty boxes and labelling then "empty"? Or maybe aligning all the items in your kitchen cupboards with a straight edge and protractor so they were in a perfect row at the correct angle. Not wanting you to miss out on international exposure you could set up a web camera of yourself hard at work so we wouldn't miss out on your important contribution to world order.
D
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