Lilies - I need more like this!

I have two small columns of stones in the back yard. In front of each, I planted three day lilies two years ago. This week, the first of 100 possible blooms have opened.
A few photos: http://www.tfrog.com/digitals/daily/daily.htm
My daughter is a huge fan of Tiger Lilies. Here in the Northeastern US, Tigers are considered weeds - they grow everywhere, seen most alongside the roadways. Didn't take me long to figure out that no local nurseries sold the things, and more than one nursery told me to take a shovel, drive out into the countryside somewhere, and dig some up. So that's exactly what I did. Like the day lilies, the Tigers have now spread out quickly and are throwing up dozens of stalks, which usually bloom on Father's Day. One person warmed me that the Tigers would try to take over my entire back yard. Is that a bad thing?
After this year's bloom, I'll be transplanting some of the tigers to strategic places about the property, leaving the rest as a sort of nursery of my own. I want LOTS of them.
Point is, with no attention or tending from me, these lilies have done fantastically well. I am not generally an active gardener, but do enjoy maintenance. I will work on a given area to create an "environment" by clearing the area, bringing in new plants, and arranging things to my own liking. But the occasional weeding is the extent of my overall landscaping.
I need more plants like these, that can take care of themselves, grow and spread, and put forth fantastic beauty year after year.
dwight
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well, Dwight, first thing, the common daylilies you are referring to as "Tiger lilies" is not correct. Not that I'm anal about names, I'm not. The common daylilies that are ditch lilies are hemerocallis and they were once referred to as "Quanzo Lilies". Not sure why, but they are the ones most of the hybrids came from. Your referral to "Tiger lilies" makes most of us think of the ORIENTAL Lilies that come up in Mid June. From actual bulbs that have scales, the stems rise almost six to seven feet tall once established, the bulbils are black and at the base of the lance like leaves and drop off and root and make even more Tiger lilies, and the petals are reflexed back and spotted black dots with orange petals. There are other colors of Tiger lilies. Ditch lilies are the best referal name. And they spread like wildfire. I had the triple variety of the 'Quanzo" ditch lilies that have been shared for over 180 years between old ladies. Orange with maroon throats with three layers of petals and the stems don't break or give under the weight of the petals and flowers, and blooms? Awesome. And they spread like weeds. I adore them still. You need to look for tetraploid daylilies, and for lables that say "rebloomers" as there are now breeds of them that rebloom in the fall!! beautiful pictures by the way, and is that an eagle or a hawk? (don't flame me people, sometimes I just can't tell). I've been going through my many incredible images I captured of my former "Faerie Holler" which I have renamed "Vinca Ridge" as vinca major has taken it (as well as probably millions of 4 o'clocks) over. it's hard to see the many daylilies I too had of colorations and varieties that boggle my mind now as I see their faces. My favorite if I could bear it was a tetraploid called at the time "Bruce". A strong red one that had huge awesome blossoms and enormous fat buds. Happy gardening and good to meet you. I've been on this newsgroup writing and sharing and helping with questions now for over 13 years.
maddie up in the green bowl, surrounded by the Cherokee National Forest and Appalachians in eastern Tennessee, zone 6b- 7a
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The photos that I pointed to before are day lilies of forgotten origin, but are not the same that I call "Tiger lilies." For the Tigers, this is a better photo: http://www.tfrog.com/digitals/images/flora/0455.htm or http://www.tfrog.com/digitals/images/flora/0517.htm
While these may not actually BE Tiger lilies, that is what they are commonly called in this area (around Philly, anyway). In other words, not every kleenex is a Kleenex. A Google Images search for "tiger lily" shows that there is widespread confusion about what is and is not a real "Tiger Lily."

Yes, but "ditch lily" just doesn't have the same ring to it...

Now that WOULD be something to look for. Mine would be the only yard in the neighborhood with fall blooms.

I put those photos up, so that I could ask about that bird in a bird forum. I was told that it was an osprey, which matches and makes sense - our property backs up to a reservoir, so we do see the occasional water bird up in that tree. My favorite was a young green heron who posed for me.
http://www.tfrog.com/digitals/lenses/100_400L/0359.jpg

Thanks. While I am new to THIS newsgroup, I'm not new to usenet at all. I've always counted on various newsgroups for answers and advice, and the signal-to-noise ratio here in RG is just fine. Plenty of helpful folks here, passionate about this topic. Good to see. And thanks for your reply. I've learned a few new things, which always makes me just that much more dangerous.
For the first time in my adult life, I finally have a property with room to do whatever I want (ah, if only I had a water feature - a pond or a burbling brook). To me, it's still a blank slate, and I'm putting in little touches here and there, trying to get a feel for the landscape. Because I'm also a photograpy nut, I find that gardening (or whatever it is that I actually do) goes hand in hand with that.
One of my grand schemes is to install a wildflower garden of about 25' X 50' out back, with a mown path throughout and an area for benches, so I can sit out there and take pictures of whatever comes along...

dwight, in the outer berburbs of Philadelphia, with his own little piece of heaven
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dwight said:

Oh yeah, that's a perfectly nice, common daylily (Hemerocallis). And edible, too. The flowers make a wonderful addition to a green salad at dinnertime, and no great loss as the blossoms you pick were going to fade with the evening anyway.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI ('someplace.net' is comcast)

After enlightenment, the laundry.
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Yes, Dwight, the flowers you have pictured are Common Daylily, Hemerocallis fulva. (The double flowered variety is Kwanzo) They grow from fleshy, tuberous roots.
Tiger lilies are true lilies, Lilium lancifolium. They grow from bulbs. The petals are recurved backwards and the blooms have brown/black spots. (Why people thought tigers had spots, I don't know, but that's what they named them)
Whatever you choose to call them, they're both beautiful plants. Emilie NorCal
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