Lawn Covered In Moss

I am doing some landscaping on my new property, close to a lake but there are trees all around the house, so not much sunlight gets to garden. Around 50% of the current lawn is covered in moss, it looks pretty bad. The grass is probably dead underneath in some of the heavier mossy areas.
Any tips on how to save as much as possible? I don't fancy doing a whole re-sowing there's quite a bit
--
Mathink


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Mathink wrote:

Turf grass does not grow well in full shade but moss loves it... you have work to do... you need to Rethink, Mathink.
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On Jan 25, 1:55am, Mathink <smackmah-MUNGMUNGMUNG-

Lots of good info on the net but from a Pacific NW prespective, It is all for nought unless you can get some sun. Might win a battle this year maybe even next year also but the war is a long way off and those trees just get bigger. As Sheldon alludes to rethink your plan, go native.
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Gunner, do you actually NEED a lawn? True, I'm posting from drought- plagued So. Calif, where strenuous measures are being taken to have people convert their lawns to xeriscapic landscaping. (Wikipedia: "Xeriscaping and xerogardening refers to landscaping and gardening in ways that reduce or eliminate the need for supplemental water from irrigation." )
You could have a handsome "lawn" covered with a thick layer of large nugget wood mulch, or even go to pebbles or granite. Would work well with your reported lack of sunshine.
HB
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. (Wikipedia:

Thanks for the suggestion HB. I understand your rationale but need you to change the visual for a moment. Think Japanese Garden for up here. Water conservation is not an issue here. Crushed rock and evergreen needles of the many varieties do not mix well. Beauty Bark as bark nuggets are called here need to be refreshed often as they break down quickly, especially the finer grades. Last year I use a modest 5 yards, this year I estimate 8. I have scores of scores of natives and closely matched non natives, This year alone I have 85 native trees and shrubs ordered for P/U 1st of March, (~1/3 will be bedded for future bonsai material ) last year was similar. So using natives is not an issue either.
I use Beauty Bark ( as Nugget bark is called here) for soil amendment planting as well as mulch, but again needles and bark mixed are not all that pretty and you cannot blow off wet needles from either rock or bark very well. crushed rock paths do not last long here without a continuous resupply because of the high OM breakdown in our climate. The moles that love our many worms don't help as they drill their vent pipes all through the area. I will never use rubber mulch. I am rescaping some lawn to accommodate the growing trees and shrubs on my neighbors side and the small tree farm behind me. I have 2 greenbelts in front and back . The angle of the sun is very important up here as it the orientation of the landscaping. We are a Moss laboratory which is nice accessory touch for bonsai. Preparation of the soil for plants up here is I believe harder than it is perhaps where you are. My particular soil is clay mixed with baseball size scree. Liquefaction is more an issue here than any other place I have every seen and I have lived in some pretty swampy places. So the Xeri is not the answer for here. Modify the aesthetics and you have the Japanese style of being in harmony with nature...the same.... but different
Correct me if you think I'm wrong, "Xeri" appears to be a re-branding of Mediterranean gardening as an Eco Nu-Age concept. Do a Google image for xeriscape, then Mediterranean garden and Moorish garden and note the distinct similarities in style and concept. If youre interested in this style and conservation/desert living, search for Qanat wind tower technologies then combine that w/ your Xeri gardens and a true water saver....hydroponics, even better... aquaponics, now you got a home grown eco-driven , nutrient making, plant feeding protein. Better than NASA. ....then you got a more sustainable desert living environment, although I would build it underground or at least 2/3 below grade. But there are those stupid building codes and covenants because everyone what us to be like them. . Just know I have never seen the wisdom of building English/Euro style gardens in the desert areas nor subsidizing golf courses with cheap H2O. I also never saw the wisdom of stick built A/C boxes to live in arid climates either. That is white man thinking, Try instead Puebloan or Persian for concept ideas.
I do appreciate your view and for you expressing that view. I think civil exchanges are important so we don't get stuck in old think and claim old ways are always the best. I am always on the hunt for best practices.
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