Killing a tree stump?

Hi there,
I have recently removed two trees from my garden as they were becoming too big and were blocking out too much sunlight in certain parts of the garden. They are c8 inches in diameter and i have managed to chainsaw my way through the stup so that only 4inches remains on the one and about 10 inches on the other [due to its location it was difficult to get any lower].
Is there anything i can do to stop them re-growing/spruting or is that it?
I hope someone can advise.
Regards, Anthony
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

In the long run you would probably be happier if the stumps simply didn't exist, right? I recently had two stumps at least twice the size you quote removed in my back yard: total cost $80 and nothing was left except two piles of dirt mixed with finely shredded wood. Two stumps in the front yard, each about 24" in diameter cost cost a total of $110 to destroy. Of course, given enough time stumps will disappear naturally but waiting the necessary years can be tedious.
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John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you don't want to have them removed you can probably just spray them with round-up, or even burn them.
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Drill a few vertical holes in the stumps and very carefully pour in some Roundup. One application should be enough.
Do not spray the stump.
Roundup is a systemic herbicide which is normally absorbed through living green matter. Your stumps have no green matter left, so you need to get a fair amount into the core of the remainder of the tree. Spraying the stump is basically a waste of Roundup.
============ Anthony wrote
Hi there,
I have recently removed two trees from my garden as they were becoming too big and were blocking out too much sunlight in certain parts of the garden. They are c8 inches in diameter and i have managed to chainsaw my way through the stup so that only 4inches remains on the one and about 10 inches on the other [due to its location it was difficult to get any lower].
Is there anything i can do to stop them re-growing/spruting or is that it?
I hope someone can advise.
Regards, Anthony
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I also drill vertical holes into the stump, but instead of roundup I fill them with table salt.

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Salt is less expensive, but I prefer Roundup because I don't want the sodium introduced into my soil. For $1 worth of Roundup, I know that the stump will die and that the Roundup which leeches into the soil will be harmless. (I buy Roundup in the huge containers and the price per ounce is very economical that way.)
For many stumps in an area in which I'm not concerned about the sodium, I would go with the salt. And, of course, inexpensive sodium nitrate provides a double benefit: It helps perform a somewhat quick kill on the stump (still not as fast as Roundup), and it provides the first step in a very, very good method of burning a stump and its root structure.
Interesting question for which I don't have an immediate answer: Does the use of Roundup or sodium impede the absorbtion and distribution of nitrates throughout the stump and its root system? In other words, is the distribution of the nitrate optimized by a still living stump and root system?
Gideon
============
M.Paul wrote I also drill vertical holes into the stump, but instead of roundup I fill them with table salt.
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If your stumps are very close to your home then you may want to avoid rotting the trunk as it'll attract termites.
-- Tara
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On 18 Sep 2006 12:38:25 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Drill several holes in the trunk. Keep putting fertilizer in the holes and cutting off the suckers. Or, fill the holes with saltpeter and burn the trunk.
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A lot depends on the species of the trees. Aspens, for instance, are notorious senders-upof new shoots. The easiest thing to do, imho, is to start a year or two before... ring the bark on the tree down through the cambium. The tree then uses the stored reserves in the roots to send out this year's nee crop of leaves, and this year's photosynthate doesn't get transferred to the roots. After a couple of years of all give and no take to the root system, you can generally take the tree down with minimal chances of resprouting.
In your case, however, I'd suggest just a weekly walk around with a sharp hoe, looking for evidence of regrowth.
Kay
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

If you are in a zone good for huckleberries, & would want lovely fruiting shrubs where the trees were, carve the stumps centers out until there's a wooden "pot" that will hold a lot of woodchips & soil such as red and oval leaf huckleberries like best. The hucks will thrive for years as the stumps rot away. Once there is nothing left of the stumps, the hucks will likely fade away (or at least no longer produce harvestable amounts of good sized berries), as they need a super high amount of beneficial fungus that devours wood & which they get only by growing on stumps.
-paghat the ratgirl
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You can also make a bird bath from the tree stump by placing a basin or upside-down pot tray on top of the stump.
If saplings sprout up near the tree stump, pull them out with a weed twister, the one with the coiled tines.
Reduce, re-use, recycle, ...
paghat wrote:

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