Killing off a stump

I had a small shrub growing on top of a wall. I think it was elderberry. I cut this down a couple of years ago, but it then regrew. Unfortunately it has quite cleverly distorted the drain pipe, which has added to the problem, but giving it a steady supply of water! I have now cut it down and pulled out a rootstock about the size of a fist. However there are still a few roots that go down into the wall cavity and I doubt I will be able to remove these.
So, what is the best way to treat the roots, so they don't resprout. I understand that ammonium sulphamate, which was sold as root out has now been banned.
Appreciate some tips. Thanks Tim
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Brushwood killer available from any good garden centre.
Peter Crosland
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Peter Crosland wrote:

For elder, simply wait till new shoots appear and glyphosate them.
In fact cutting back to the ground will kill it too..have these pop up all over the place: they don't survive even an annual mowing. In fact not much woody stuff does.
Actually, very few perennials survive mowing..grass of course does, and some weeds. Nettles brambles and elder dont.
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I used some glyphosate in the spring in a similar situation and it seems to have been very effective. Being a tightwad, I could see that the powder at my local was a more expensive way to buy than a ready made spray, even though the final concentration would be similar. So I bought the spray to see what would happen and nothing's grown back yet.
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2008 05:20:59 -0700 (PDT), Tim Decker

Not exactly banned, rather not worth the company making the chemical relicensing it, I think.
Glyphosate is still a licensed stump treatment and probably some of the broadleaved herbicides containing trichlopyr, 2-4d (timbrel is one).
sodium chlorate will work but contaminate the area for a long time.
AJH
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I have used potassium permanganate for tree stump removal in the past. I suppose it must now be banned, along with most things that work.
;-)
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Bruce wrote:

Perhaps not pertinent to this query, but when the electricity board cut down a number of trees they killed the stumps by making a number of horizontal cuts in the top then filling with weed killer.
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Broadback wrote:

It's only necessary to get the chemical into the cambium, so a vertical cut around the inner periphery dosed with chemical is effective.
AJH
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I have seen all the trees killed in an area by application of table salt in May, it wasn't a lawful way of killing the trees though ;-).
Twenty years on there appear to be no side effects, though the regrowth is largely birch rather than the pines that were there before.
AJH
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It certainly works. To avoid contamination, drill a few downward sloping holes in the side of the trunk with a flat bit. Spoon in some chlorate then plug with a wine cork or similar. Or in the top of course if wide enough.
Peter Scott
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Peter Scott wrote:

I haven't used it for many years because it doesn't translocate like glyphosate or ammonium sulphamate. We used to do just as you say and the theory was it aided the burning of the stump later.
AJH
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That was also the reason for using permanganate of potash. It seemed to work, because the stumps would smoulder away to almost nothing.
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Bruce wrote:

OK, I only saw the stuff in small amounts in chemistry sets and as crystals for disinfecting, I think it was used in public baths for treating foot infections. Quite effective with spirit of salts IIRC ;-).
Saltpetre could be obtained in bulk then and the sodium chlorate didn't have inhibitors in it! How did we survive before terrorists showed us our errors?
AJH
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There was also "Gentian Violet" as an antiseptic. It was withdrawn from chemists about five years ago.

And all they have done is found other ingredients, such as perfume and hydrogen peroxide ....
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
saying something like:

Common practice on farms round here is to drill a few 1" holes in the stump and fill them up with fertiliser granules. In such concentration it's a toxin, not a fertiliser.
--
Dave
GS850x2 XS650 SE6a
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Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:

To get rid of a stump drill a number of holes in it. Then repeatedly fill with a strong saltpetre solution. After a while built a bonfire over the stump, light and enjoy!
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We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
saying something like:

It's what's available to hand, really. I wonder if a fertiliser-ed stump would burn as well.
--
Dave
GS850x2 XS650 SE6a
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