Is Sevin A Good General Purpose Insecticide?

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Billy wrote:

Well, that settles it, the next person that complains abut the skeeters will just have to sacrifice for the good of pollinating the vegetables. Bon Appetit Mosquitos.
As it turns out, I'm full of misconceptions about mosquitos, they don't breed in tall grasses and ground cover and they are poor carriers of heartworm in cats (which I have an abundance of). There is still West Nile, with cases here every year.
Curiously, to me at least, catnip is a repellent.
So, I think I'll take Tony's advice to hunt down even small pools of water, and then plant catnip. What harm is in that? The cats will prefer it over permethrin which curiously is toxic to felines.
I continue to be amazed that unintended consequences is the rule, not the exception.

To you to. I'd trade a big bowl of blackberries for one of those ribs!
Jeff
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On 5/30/10 7:47 AM, Jeff Thies wrote [in part]:

Be very careful. Catnip is in the mint family and is very invasive. Soon, your garden could be 100% catnip.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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David E. Ross wrote:

I seem to be replacing one invasive species with another. So far I've replaced periwinkle with english ivy and japanese grass with ivy leaf morning glory. I wonder what will replace the mimosa. Wisteria and honeysuckle are just whacked back and tolerated.
http://www.gaeppc.org/list.cfm
Somewhere along the line I've missed having kudzu, which replaces everything. Trees, houses and slow moving animals.
Jeff
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Sound like a new topic to me.
--
Bill S. Jersey USA zone 5 shade garden
What use one more wake up call?
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and take naps next to it. The other 2 just ignore it. It is growing out of a space in a cinderblock, but that wouldn't slow down most mints. The Prunella vugaris, that I count on for BP control, shows up in the most unlikely places around the yard. Fortunately, I still consume more than I grow, so it goes where it will.
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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Billy wrote:

Thanks.
I had no idea what it was. None is flowering now and I don't remember where I used to see it. As I recall it was very short.
I think I'll put the catnip in at the garden walk edge next to the english ivy so they can duke it out, I seem to recall that it grew in poor soil and part sun. I had some out with the other mints and I notice now that all the mints are gone. Funny, it was getting invasive, and now it is gone. I think it has been out competed by plants that thrive in the wetter weather of the last couple years. I never really liked mint juleps anyways and I had no other use, although my Czech friend used it like body perfume!
Jeff
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On 5/29/2010 6:31 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

David, what's BT?
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Bacillus thuringiensis http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/insect/05556.pdf
How's that garden doin'?
--
- Billy
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
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On 5/30/2010 2:03 AM, Billy wrote:

Thanks, Billy.
The garden is doing great; although my back is not doing so well. :-)
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Gardening is a matter of your enthusiasm holding up until your back gets used to it. ~Author Unknown
--
- Billy
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On 5/29/10 8:48 AM, EVP MAN wrote:

Sevin is good for combating lawn insects.
However, your first step should be to identify what insects are damaging your vegetables. Sevin might not be effective against them. It might also kill predatory insects that feed on the ones causing damage. Take a few of the damaged leaves to a good nursery (not a hardware store or lumber yard) for identification. Carry the leaves sealed in a plastic bag (e.g., Ziploc) so that you don't risk contaminating the plants at the nursery.
Once you know what is causing the damage, a good nursery should be able to advise you on treatment. They might even advise you to ignore the damage if the impact on your vegetable crops will be slight. Or they might recommend an insecticide that is narrowly specific to your problem instead of a broad-spectrum insecticide such as Sevin. The more narrow your attack, the less impact on the overall environment.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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