Fast Growing Tall Hedge?

I am looking for something that would make a 20' to 35' tall privacy screen. Agressive rooting would be a plus as I'm planting along the top edge of a large hill. Also, medium to wide span would be a plus. And of course, I want it fast. "Weed" trees and shrubs are fine with me.
My main concern is height and speed. I'm willing to sacrifice a little height to gain faster growth. The Washington Hawthorn sounds nice, but isn't as fast as I want. Hybrid Willows grow too tall. Olives aren't quite tall enough, but would suffice if they met my other criteria. The Siberian Elm is a little taller than I'm looking for (around 45'), but could work since it can be trimmed.
I am basing this on reading catalogs/advertisements. However, I'm looking for practical experience now. I live in SE Ohio (Zone 6).
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leyland Cypress.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Would ultimately grow 80' to 100', hardly within his range. I would also be concerned with their hardiness in that sort of location-- they are just hardy to Zone 6.
Have a look at Thuja plicata 'Green Giant' for a fast growing, attractive evergreen screen. Anoter choice is Photinia x fraseri, red-tipped photinia.
Of the deciduous trees, a fast growing choice might be Morus alba, aka Mulberry. NOTE: this is truly a trash tree, but grows extremely fast and would be dirt cheap to plant.
Dave

screen. Agressive rooting would be a plus as I'm planting along the top edge of a large hill. Also, medium to wide span would be a plus. And of course, I want it fast. "Weed" trees and shrubs are fine with me.
My main concern is height and speed. I'm willing to sacrifice a little height to gain faster growth. The Washington Hawthorn sounds nice, but isn't as fast as I want. Hybrid Willows grow too tall. Olives aren't quite tall enough, but would suffice if they met my other criteria. The Siberian Elm is a little taller than I'm looking for (around 45'), but could work since it can be trimmed.
I am basing this on reading catalogs/advertisements. However, I'm looking for practical experience now. I live in SE Ohio (Zone 6).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mountain Laurel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kalmias are neither fast growing nor will they ever be tall enough outside of their native environment. Photinias will not be winter hardy. It is unlikely Leylands would live long enough to attain their full mature height ( and VERY few ever get as big as 80-100'), but they certainly are fast enough and provide excellent screening potential. And can be sheared to remain at desired height. Thuja 'Green Giant' certainly offers the ideal solution - very hardy in your zone, fast growth rate (2-5' per year), evergreen and should be widely available.
pam - gardengal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I note photinia to be hardy to Zone 6...

height
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think that is a little generous, David. Most references indicate zone 7 hardiness - some even clarify it to zone 7b or 8. Temperature-wise, it is typically rated to 10F, which would put it in zone 7. I am just concerned that a plant that has considerable problems in the best of situations will really suffer if sited in an area of marginal hardiness.
pam - gardengal
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Depends on your area. Here mountain laurel grow fast and tall. Privets also do fine in the winter. Photentia make a good everygreen fast growing hedge also.

height
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I planted an 80 foot row of Rose of Sharon 5 years ago. They are now 10 feet tall. They give a lot of privacy in the summer, flower in late summer, but drop their leaves in the winter. They don't mind trimming, in fact, they get thicker with trimming. It seems to be a favorite of aphids and attacts ladybugs, humming birds, bees, and butterflies. They grow well in Ohio to Georgia. Faster growth with regularly applied fertilizers--I use cow manure, fish emulsion and Miracle Grow with compost as mulch. They like full sun but grow okay in part sun. I have some that are 10 years old and over 25 feet tall. Easy to grow and inexpensive.
On 31 Dec 2003 14:30:08 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (daecc) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lonicera Maackii -- a form of honeysuckle. Gets to about 15' or so, decent spread, and considered a noxious weed in some states. Has nice flowers and berries in the late autumn. It is deciduous however so if you need evergreen that won't work (then again, if you need evergreen and fast growing you're looking at an oxymoron).
James
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A specimen that would make a 20' - 35' screen more than likely would have be be purchsed nearly mature if you wanted it asap. Depending of how fast is fast may also depend on what you select. (purchase a 10' specimen that grows 2' a year or similar, if 5 years is fast?)
Perhaps spemimens along the lines of spruce, fir, balsam,{ Cedars }, cypress, hemlock?
J
daecc wrote:

--

Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I appreciate all the quick responses! You're giving me a lot to consider.
When I say I want it fast, 15' 5 years from now is acceptable. Something that grows 3+ feet per year would be great. I'm planting a 200' row, so anything taller than 3-4' at planting will *probably* be too expensive.
I LOVE evergreens, but many are too slow for this project. I have about 20 6-10' Hemlock (my favorite) but they are growing about 1-1.5' per year.
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We have a honeysuckle variety here that I trimmed to the ground -- it was 8 feet tall by the end of the season. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
what do your local highway dept plant?
check with your ag/coop extension website?
web search for windbreaks "zone 6"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I am in a windy exposed location. During the last four years I have planted a variety of windbreak plants including bamboo. Very much depends upon location. I have a line of Pinus radiata and Leyland cypress and the pine wins hands down on all counts. If your area is mild and not too many gales and you don't mind a deciduous plant in winter, I have found Salix basfordiana grow in my garden from 3'hi x 2'wide to the top of a nearby telegraph pole and 15'wide in four years! (It was planted to hide the 30' pole). Also, if your climate can take Hoherias then the following are worthy of investigation H lyallii and H. sexstylosa. Both trees do not pause after planting but reach for the sky straight away with 3-4' vertical growth each year. Can be somewhat short-lived (50 yrs) but they do have lovely white blooms in early summer.
-- Regards Mike Gilmore WinsfordWalledGarden, SW England, USDA Zone9a
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't know if you've gotten other responses yet, but I just saw your post about screening with trees. One of my favorite trees to use is Cryptomeria Japonica 'Yoshino'. It's a beautiful, fast growing evergreen with great texture and color. It is hardy in zones 6-8 and doesn't have disease or pest problems. I just also planted Cupressus 'arizonica' or Carolina Sapphire trees that are very fast growing between my driveway and our neighbors lawn. They are a blue/grey color with reddish tinges in the winter months. Many people plant Leyland Cypress trees because they are cheap and very fast growing. They are also a very pretty green color. The only drawback is that Bagworms like them and will sometimes destroy the tree. Once they invade, it's very difficult to eradicate all of them.
Try looking on google for the Cryptomeria and Cupressus and you'll see what I'm talking about.
Good luck,
Penny Zone 7b - North Carolina

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.