Edible Seasonal Passive Sunshade

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I would appreciate any suggestions, ideas, or criticisms of the idea of using a trellis & wire system to support vines (climbing or drooping) to shade a rooftop and house side walls in Zone 7 (hot & humid).
Would suspended planters for droopers also work?
Furthermore, if anyone has information on suitable candidates for an edible sunshade, please post it.
Thank you.
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Consider Malabar Spinach an annual. Grapes may be of interest also. Mix in moon flowers and other flowering vines for interest...NOT Edible.
Bill
--
Zone 5 S Jersey USA Shade garden in a Japanese manner
Vision problems? http://www.ocutech.com/
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William Wagner wrote:

Kudzu is edible, vining, grows fast and I believe it does VERY well in Zone 7.
April Fools. But seriously I'm sure you know better than to plant Kudzu.
In addition to the above, Not quite edible, perhaps useful if you brew your own beer though, is hops. You could train some indeterminate tomatos, some pole beans, maybe a small melon or summer squash?? Lots of plants that are edible have a vining habit.
Troy
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Hops is difficult to get rid of in a short period of time. Creeps about in a manner similar to poison ivy. Runners..Cucumbers can be trained to vine too.
Bill
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troyml@*spammenot*.gmail.com says...

If Kudzu WERE edible, world hungry would be a distant memory. All the starving hordes in China could not eat those vines as fast as they can regrow...
As it is, flamethrowers and nuclear weapons may be our only hope.
O_O
FW
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Frank White wrote:

Ah.. but Kudzu IS edible. It is a legume, and every part of the plant can be eaten. I have never had it myself since I am from the non-Kudzu blighted zone 4.
But you can eat the 'bean', the leaves, the root, and as I understand it, in its native parts of Asia it actually is a desirable culinary plant.
Here is a page I found listing some 'recipes' for Kudzu. Perhaps this summer if you're from the South you can reduce your grocery bill eh? My Google search did turn up other pages with recipes, happy hunting.
http://www.kudzucuisine.com /
Troy
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Looking at the nutritional composition of the kudzu powder described on the site, it appears to have an insane amount of fiber. Like, 5 times as much as an equivalent amount (calorie-wise) of whole wheat flour or 3 times as much as an equivalent amt. of pinto beans. So I imagine it's kind of "woody."
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fwhite*NOSPAM*@colfax.com (Frank White) wrote:

Kudzu IS edible!!! Seriously. Do some googling on it.
It also makes fantastic graze for both cattle and sheep.
I've seen recent articles on great success in controlling kudzu using sheep.
--
K.

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On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 16:30:36 -0600, Katra
<snip>

How to Grow Kudzu http://www.locksley.com/kudzu.htm

Lots of sheep!
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her son was shot to death in 2002 was arrested last week when
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Frank White wrote:
troyml@*spammenot*.gmail.com says...

idea of

drooping) to

an edible

also.
Edible.
in
TMEN ran an article about someone slashing a bunch of kudzu and bringing it home to feed the goats. Some consider goats edible. ;^)
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Grapevines? :-) The only problem with those is that they lose their leaves in the winter.
You could also try Passiflora edulis or Passiflora incarnata. Those both produce edible fruits, and they tend to be evergreen.
My Passiflora cerulea stayed green all winter thru 4 or 5 good freezes. I want to find some of the other two species and get them planted here as well.
Plastic lattice as a trellis looks nice and is more durable than wood lattice. It's more expensive but lasts forever, and it comes in colors!
--
K.

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Katra wrote:

From an energy conservation standpoint, losing the leaves in the fall is a good thing. In the hot sunny weather the foliage shades the house. In the cool winter weather with the foliage gone the sun warms the building.
Troy
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I actually did think about that... :-)
It's just that I find my naked grapevines in the winter to be none too attractive. <lol> I know my neighbor chopped out all of the ones that had spread to the trees in his yard. I don't think he would have done that if he knew that they were going to leaf out again. He probably thought that they were dead. I'm letting them go up into the trees on this side of the fence!
Besides, the blooms on passion vines are just gorgeous!!!
Here was my very first one ever that bloomed this year. I planted the vine in a 5 gallon pot next to my greenhouse late last summer:
http://home.centurytel.net/Katraslink/PassionFlower2.jpg
--
K.

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Katra wrote:

Losing leaves is a good thing. Lets in winter sunshine. The subject did specify "seasonal passive sunshade".
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Katra wrote:

Any suggestions on how to get Passiflora edulis seeds to sprout. I received a bunch as a gift last fall, so far I've tried pete tabs and sowing them straight into potting soil in 4 inch pots. So far nary a sprout is to be seen. Should I pre-soak the seeds? score them, soak them in alcohol or peroxide?
Thanks in advance. David
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Urine works a treat.
Soak them in urine for 3 days.
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I am new to passiflora... so have no experience (yet) to pass on. Did a brief google tho' and this site looks promising for this:
http://www.passionflow.co.uk/seed211.htm
I am hoping to get seeds this year, but will also experiment with starting from cuttings. Mine is P. cerulea.
--
K.

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Katra wrote:

Thanks for the link. I'd done some searching previously, but had not seen this page. Looks like I have some experimentation ahead of me. Good luck with your P. cerulea.
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David said the following on 03/04/2005 04:38 pm:

<snip>
http://www.pfaf.org / Plants for a future has a database of over 7000 useful plants. Might be worth a look at.
Andy
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Thank you! :-) I'm currently attempting hand pollination of some blossoms to try to induce fruiting. I want to try seed propagation, but am also planning on playing around with air layering for clone propagation.
--
K.

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