Comfrey -- to move or not move...

Okay, opinions please...
I have a Comfrey plant that someone gave me in June. It was a feeble little thing when I got it but now it is like a show plant -- absolutely huge, lush and vivid dark green. The root ball would probably fill a bushel basket. I know if I leave it here, it will probably be mowed down and destroyed and I'm wondering if it is worth it to move it? And if I try to move it, how much can I cut it back (tops and/or roots) before I damage it fatally? I'm taking a lot of my favorite smaller herbs with me because I can't stand the thought of them being slaughtered but this is by far the biggest outside plant I'm thinking of moving. My thirty-five year old Xmas Cactus is the biggest indoor plant I'm moving. :)
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When I purchase a plant from Nichol's all I got was a piece of root. I then hacked it into pieces after about a year and most made it . Intent was perennial chicken food additions.
Bill
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comfrey
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Could you expand on using comfrey for chickens? I have lots of both. (Russian comfrey and laying hens.)
Thanks,
Jan
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Comfrey can be used a a fodder for chickens. Gives them something to nibble on and it is perennial. Can also be used a green manure.
Fodder \Fod"der\ (f[o^]d"d[~e]r), v. t. [imp. & p. p. (f[o^]d"d[~e]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. .] To feed, as cattle, with dry food or cut grass, etc.; to furnish with hay, straw, oats, etc. [1913 Webster]
Bill
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Comfrey - be careful if you move it! Every tiny bit of root will re grow. Its a great plant, its a useful plant - it makes medicine - it makes great garden compost (do not put in seeds - do not put in roots, let leaves air dry for a bit before adding to compost pile) The chickens love it and you will be rewarded with lovely golden yellow egg yolks, and healthier chickens. When I had a farm I just grew a hedge of the stuff in the chicken run. Colette
William Wagner wrote:

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Comfrey "tea" makes an excellent drink for thirsty plants, too. :)
I've been cleaning the barn kittens eyes with a crushed leaf dipped in water to clear up their goopy eyes. It's taken a while but they're all better now.
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Take a bit of it, you know it'll grow into another show plant!
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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wrote:

FW Take all you want. You will not hurt comfrey, and neither will mowing it down. It will just come up again and again. My son has a plant and I harvest every leaf for making my Comfrey smelly-swamp tea. It grows back in a week. It is great for your plants as fertilizer. Be careful, be very careful!! If comfrey is in good soil and gets water it can take over. Try to dig it out and every little 1/2 inch piece of root that is left in the ground will sprout into a new plant.... Seen the 'Sorcerer's Apprentice' with M. Mouse?? That broom must have been made of comfrey. :^> When I had to get it out of here, the only way I finished it off was to cover the whole area with a sheet of metal, weigh it down with concrete blocks, and not let it get ANY water for 6 months. I do like it, but in a pot, or at my son's house! Emilie NorCal
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