2 climbers need ID

Hi,
I am new here and I hope you can help me to solve mystery of 2 climber plants I have in my garden. I have 'inherited' both of them from the former house owner and unfortunately they were cut severely in early spring by a builder working on fence repairs. I think this is the reason why none of them flowered in the summer. I am sending pictures attached - maybe you will be able to identify them? They seem to have recovered quite well and spread on the fence. I wonder if I should keep them or replace with other climber of my choice?
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Amber123


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Amber123;940026 Wrote: > Hi, this rather pretty plant with slim silvery leaves just appeared > between strawberries in my garden. I wonder if it is a weed or some > interesting plant worth keeping?
Hi Amber, its a Buddleja seedling, now some may call this a weed ?? but it depends on your definition of a weed ?? I think you will find that if you let it grow, its odds on to be a pale blue, which im sure your familiar with living in London !!
Lannerman.
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lannerman


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lannerman;940027 Wrote: > Hi Amber, its a Buddleja seedling, now some may call this a weed ?? but > it depends on your definition of a weed ?? I think you will find that if > you let it grow, its odds on to be a pale blue, which im sure your > familiar with living in London !!

You are right, I know the plant, although honestly I have never paid attention to the leaves (so much to look at at the flowers, all these butterflies!). I have realised that I even photographed it once:
'West Ham station | 06 Aug 2007 | theme: UK - London | photoblog by _Monika_' (http://tinyurl.com/3gfg4l4 )
Now good question is how the seeds ended up in my garden, none of the neighbours have it. But I will keep it for su)
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Amber123;940063 Wrote: > Now good question is how the seeds ended up in my garden, none of the > neighbours have it. But I will keep it for su)
Buddleja get everywhere. I think the seeds blow in the wind. Naturally they grow in cracks on cliff faces, so they need some such mechanism to get their seeds to the appropriate place. Your neighbours probably weed it out, if they have any sense.
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echinosum


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On 10/23/11 12:57 PM, Amber123 wrote:

The second one (14474) might be wisteria. Wisteria is a very vigorous climber. Someone planted one about 50 miles east of me. Soon, it covered his house. With permission from his neighbors, it eventually covered five adjacent houses. Now the town has an annual wisteria festival. Go to the following Google search: <http://www.google.com/search?q=wisteria+%22sierra+madre%22&hl=en .
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No, the second one is jasmine officinale, scented white or pinkish flowers in summer. In mild climates it's a rampantly exuberant climber so the OP needn't worry about the builder damage :-) There's also a lovely but less common creamy version called Clotted Cream, which IME produces more and larger flowers than the white one. In my garden both took a couple of years to get into their stride for regular flowering, but once they settled in they flower 6 months of the year.
Janet
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The first looks like Campsis radicans.
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On 24/10/2011 19:46, Amos Nomore wrote:

It does look like a Campsis to me, too.
If so, be aware that Campsis can be invasive. It spreads underground far from the main plant, suddenly appearing in lawns, borders, paths, and even through weedproof membranes.
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You've got that right. But Its scent is too strong for me. Have you ever tried 'jasmine tea' that has contained this very flower? This one is just right as a tea. i like it. It is mainly favored by Chinese people.
Ono
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***Endorse that. The giant Wisteria vine in Sierra Madre is well worth the trip up the mountain to the annual festival. Lots of associated activities and family fun. l. ***Sierra Madre has somehow maintained a heart-warming "small town" community flavor.
HB
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Amber123;940025 Wrote: > Hi,

> plants I have in my garden. I have 'inherited' both of them from the > former house owner and unfortunately they were cut severely in early > spring by a builder working on fence repairs. I think this is the reason > why none of them flowered in the summer. I am sending pictures attached > - maybe you will be able to identify them? They seem to have recovered > quite well and spread on the fence. I wonder if I should keep them or > replace with other climber of my choice?
Hi Amber, the one on the left looks like a Campsis radicans 'The trumpet creeper' It has large orange/red trumpet flowers in late summer. I'm only guessing that its C. radicans as this is the form most commonly grown !! (there is a variety called Campsis radicans flava which has yellow flowers). The climber on the right is a type of Jasmine and probably Jasminum officinale 'White summer Jasmine'. Both are lovely climbers and I'd keep them !! they will have benefited from being cut back hard and as you say, thats the reason you probably havent had any flowers. I'd add further climbers of your choice, this is the beauty of climbers, they can be grown together as a scrambling mass.
regards Lannerman.
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lannerman;940310 Wrote: > Hi Blackfingers, without a photo its difficult to say what you have ? > but if the stems are not hollow and they are upto 4ft tall, then its not > Japanese Knotweed. any chance of a picture when its light ??

Here are some pics
[image:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v191/ginghamtablecloth/mysteryplant2.jpg]
[image:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v191/ginghamtablecloth/mysteryplant1.jpg]
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Blackfingers said:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v191/ginghamtablecloth/mysterypla nt2.jpg]
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v191/ginghamtablecloth/mysterypla nt1.jpg]
Probably Red Osier Dogwood (Cornus sericea). Some sort of dogwood, at least.
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In message

I'm not sure. It's clearly not Fallopia japonica (Japanese knotweed), but while it looks rather Cornus-like, the leaf veins of Cornus sericea (and Cornus sanguinea) are usually more swept forwards. I'd go for some other sort of dogwood.
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@gardenbanter.co.uk says...

That's not JK or persicaria; it's more like a cornus, which is a shrub not a perennial, and not invasive.
Janet
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Co-indidentally there was a feature on Japenese Knotweed on The One Show just after I posted this thread.
Looking at the footage, these seem to be different stages. A young version where the stems are very red and slim (like the plant in my garden) and then it starts to appear bamboo like.
Confused, yes.
It is a very small patch, but we are planning on building extension on that land and need to know if there is anything in there that will potentially damage our plans/building.
Thank-you for looking
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Blackfingers


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@gardenbanter.co.uk says...

Lots of plants have red stems. If your plant was JK, then by midwinter those stems would be brittle brown husks and fall over flat if pushed. Your plant's stems are going to stay rigid and red all winter because it's a cornus.
Japanese knotweed does not have either the same growth habit or leaves as cornus
Janet
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Janet;940375 Wrote: > In article snipped-for-privacy@gardenbanter.co.uk, > Blackfingers.91f22b6

> Show

>

> it's

>

Thank-you Janet, mind is at rest now.
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Blackfingers


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Blackfingers;940332 Wrote: > Here are some pics

>
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v191/ginghamtablecloth/mysteryplant2.jpg]

>
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v191/ginghamtablecloth/mysteryplant1.jpg]
Hi Blackfingers, yes, I agree its a Cornus (dogwood) a shrub grown for its winter stem colour. To get the best colour, cut it down to 6" in late winter, thus encouraging lots of fresh new shoots.
Lannerman.
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lannerman


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wrote:

Yo, Zanahoria, which is it? Trans. from Spanish:
1. botany carrot 2. Argentina dummy, nitwit
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