Yellow leaves on plum tree

Hi all.
I have a 4 year old vic plum planted last year. some of the older leaves are turning yellow. Would I be right in thinking this is due to lack of nitrogen? The tree is planted with grass right up to the trunk, so I thought I would use a liquid nitrogen feed.
Thanks
Peter
--
Halo


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Halo wrote:

Possibly a nitrogen deficiency. A little Miracle Grow around the tree wouldn't hurt. It is generally not a good idea to have grass, or anything else growing within the drip line of the tree. It takes energy away from the tree.
Yellow leaves could be indicative of a more serious problem. If the leaves turn this color in the fall, this could be a sign that the tree is going dormant or dying. Check the base for entry holes of borers.
You did not give your location and type of soil, which could give more clues to the problem. Did you get a lot of rain this year, and does your soil drain well?
Sherwin
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Hmmm ...
Not having any plum trees, so I am not expert. I lean toward iron deficiency.
The yellowing of leaves is called Chlorosis in normal green plants. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chlorosis
As for using "liquid nitrogen" requires careful use! In a science class "liquid nitrogen" was used to dip a rose in it and then smashed on the table. The rose shattered like glass :) Very Cool Huh :)
Enjoy Life ... Dan
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Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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In article < snipped-for-privacy@news.eternal-

This year has produced chlorosis in a number of sun-loving plants and those that don't like wet feet.
It has been overcast wet and cool (for here) all spring.
So far "summer" has been a little better. At least we're getting some sun, a bit less rain, some higher daytime temperatures and the long days are helping a little.
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says...

To add to phorbin's post http://urbanext.illinois.edu/focus/chlorosis.html will give you a bit of help in determining the cause.
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gunner wrote:

The article you referenced says that iron chlorosis usually shows up on the younger leaves first, then the older leaves. This might indicate their other suggestion of manganese or zinc deficiences.
I would still not rule out other possiblities, like over watered roots or the tree going prematurely into dormancy because of some disease or insect damage. The original poster has left out many details, like is this yellowing on all branches, or just certain ones, etc.
Sherwin
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Thanks for all the replies, I've been away the last few days. I'm based in the UK, Midlands. So we've had some heavy rain recently, but also allot of sunshine, for the UK at least. The soils is a little sandy, so drains quite well. The yellowing of the leaves is not on this years new growth at all & mainly on the older leaves. I've also noticed this morning that a few plums have dropped also.
My idea of lack of nitrogen was based on a quick search on goggle, as I didn't think it was water logged & got plenty of water.
I did mean a liquid fertilizer that also contains nitrogen. I don't plan to have my plum tree cryogenically frozen.
Thanks
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Halo wrote:

If you have other similar plants nearby with or without the same problem, it could be a soil deficiency of minerals. Here in the USA, we have a product called Miracle Grow, a liquid fertilizer, but you must have something like it in Britain.
The tree may be in trouble for other reasons. Check for insect attacks (borers at the soil line). Again, is this on all branches or just particular ones? This could be a climatic thing, and if so, the tree should come back ok next year. Are there any damages to the leaves besides yellowing, and does the fruit look normal? The web site posted indicated that older leaves turning yellow was a possible sign of zinc or magnesium deficiency.
Sherwin
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Why don't you take a sample to your nearest nursery and ask them what they thing. Maybe the local secondary school has a biologist. Maybe there is a college or university near you that is familiar with your regions flora and fauna, huh?
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- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
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Billy wrote:

Gee, he could have saved a lot of time by just bypassing this forum and going directly to his nearest 'experts' location. This to me is just a cop out when you have no knowledge of the subject matter.
Sherwin
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says...

Yes. He could have saved time. That said, having some knowledge makes for better questions.
Halo's follow up contained, "The yellowing of the leaves is not on this year's new growth at all & mainly on the older leaves."
Let's assume that he means the older leaves are on previous years' wood and not, last year's leaves carried through the winter and still on the tree.
That suggests, as you suspect, some kind of trouble on, in, or inside the tree and not an environmental, nitrogen uptake issue or soil problem, though it may be that the soil is also in trouble.
Given we can't go have a look at it, consulting with a reputable local expert or two to get a diagnosis seems reasonable to me.
I don't know about anyone else, but I would be loathe to feed anything but compost to a distressed tree until I know what's going on with it. Even then, compost and other organic amendments.
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replying to sherwin dubren, BG in Minnesota wrote:

Minnesota in July - yes to a lot of rain - it is on the side of a hill so it has good drainage- nutrients could have washed away - perhaps miracle grow idea would be best/
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Halo;855286 Wrote: > Hi all.

> leaves are turning yellow. Would I be right in thinking this is due to > lack of nitrogen? The tree is planted with grass right up to the trunk, > so I thought I would use a liquid nitrogen feed.

Hi Peter, I think you're right, I checked a few different sources and it does sound like nitrogen deficiency rather than lack of iron or magnesium (due to it being on older leaves not younger leaves) I've been using a fertilizer called 6x which is basically heat treated dried manure, You buy it in a big square tub with an orange lid. It's hard to go wrong with this stuff. It's easy to overdo it with some fertilizers
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Hcaterpillar;857195 Wrote: > Hi Peter, I think you're right, I checked a few different sources and it > does sound like nitrogen deficiency rather than lack of iron or > magnesium (due to it being on older leaves not younger leaves) I've > been using a fertilizer called 6x which is basically heat treated dried > manure, You buy it in a big square tub with an orange lid. It's hard to > go wrong with this stuff. It's easy to overdo it with some fertilizers
Hi i'm new on here (first post)
i have a similar problem with my plum tree, not sure of it's age as it was in the garden when i moved in, only small though
after a couple of years of cutting it back, i'm now letting it grow.
any way i recently came back from holiday to find my tree which was lovely and green when i left, all the leaves turned yellow and drooping, the new growth is still green though, i think it may be a fungus as the bark is coming away and i can see fungus on the outside, also a few insects scuttling around.
i like the peter am in the midlands
the tree has been fed this year obvioulsy was no fruit as all new growth
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chefitychef


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