swiss chard

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I left out an 'm'. It's 'umbellifera'. Think 'carrot' family - carrot, parsnip, Queen Anne's lace etc.
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Farm1 wrote: ...

ah, ok, yes, we have gobs of queen-annes-lace here. i have to continually weed it or we will be overrun. it flowers a little later than the alfalfa.
it's funny because i was thinking "umbrella" when i first read what you wrote.
songbird
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Derald wrote:

i like all of them. my own cooking times in the past i've used them. now i don't cook as much so have to limit my plantings to what will be used or it is a waste of space and effort.
with okra, chard and turnips i'm hoping to widen the cooking palette, but i think she's already determined she won't like the turnips. i have a good chance with the chard. okra, doubtful, it might be too much like black pepper. we'll see.
we lost cabbage this past year, she won't cook with it any longer other than saurkraut. :( to me that is about the whole point of veggie soup...
songbird
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Tastes do vary. Some of them are genetic variations (in people) and others are just preference.
In the former category, cilantro, or as I call it, moldy-sock-plant, which restaurants have become frond of tossing in things where they don't mention it on the menu. AKA Mexican parsley and fresh coriander. I can taste the revolting crap in dishes where people that like the stuff can't. I can think of no method of preparing a substance that tastes like mouldy socks that would in any way appeal to me. Well, perhaps gathering 100% of the worldwide genetic stock someplace and roasting at 5000 degrees for 16 hours would do it. ;-)
In the "probably latter but I don't know" the entire brassica family. Saurkraut is the only thing from there I can stand, and I suspect it's because the notorious stink of krauting is the removal of an obnoxious sulfur compound I cannot stand, otherwise typical of the family.
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You should try cilantro pesto, when the cilantro is in flower. Yummy!
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No, I shouldn't. Find a damp basement with a washing machine in it, dig around behind the washing machine until you find a lost, moldering sock, make pesto with it, and you'll have an idea of what I would taste...
This is not a matter of "how it's prepared", this is a matter of "cilantro tastes (to me, and a bunch of other people with the same genetic 'switch' thrown) the way moldy socks smell" - so pesto would be a waste of perfectly good nuts, oil, garlic cheese and lemon (or whatever you put in _your_ pesto other than leaves). I have basil and sorrel and nasturtiums that will make a pesto that does _not_ taste like moldy socks smell.
Other sources liken the taste to the smell of bedbugs, which I've so far avoided having the delightful-I'm-sure experience of smelling in person.
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I didn't like cilantro on my first introduction to them either, but now it is hard for me not to get enough cilantro, and japapenos into my salsa, refried beans, or guacamole, yum, yum, yum.
Pesto here is normally basil (best in flower), garlic (not enough to drown out the basil), and extra virgin olive oil with Parmesan, Romano, or Asagio on the side to taste.
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songbird wrote:

Maybe it wasn't the preparation. Silverbeet can get very strong and metallic in flavour if it is too old, typically such leaves are dark coloured and thick. You need to keep the leaves coming so you can cut them at a good size but young.
D
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"Dirt chunks" should have been a dead giveaway.
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Well, there is "chacun son got", or "de gustibus et coloribus non est disputandum". Still, I use them in salads, as a vegetable side dish, in stews, or part of a stir fry.
They are very healthy as you can see. <http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/24 00/2>
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I thought about that and I've dismissed it as merely being lack of experience on the part of the eater :-))
I was thinking about this issue as I went about my chores after posting here this morning. I tried to think of a vegetable of which I didn't like the taste. There really wasn't one veg I could name IF and I do mean if, it was harvested at optimum time and well prepared. All, overly big, tired and poorly or unimaginatively cooked veg can, and most often are, hideous.
If I had been asked in my 20s if I liked silver beet, or Broad Beans (Fava beans in USian) I'd have said no. Then I discovered how to both harvest them and cook and present them. I could also have said that I'm not overly fond of Brussel Sprouts but very young and tender ones are a delight - ditto swedes and turnips. But all of these must be young and cooked by a compatent cook. I even like chillies if prepared so as not to blow my brains out (what few I still possess).
Himself (my SO) used to say that he hated green beans. After putting up with that crap comment for decades, I finally decided to ignore his wishes and plant them. He has now discovered that when picked young and steamed so they don't go a grey colour, they are actually well worth eating. Maybe not on his I want to eat then 5 timfes a week list, but certainly soemthing he eats and doesn't whinge aobut when he sees them on his plate.
There is a British cook/lifestyle bloke called Hugh Fearley-Whittingstall who does wonderful TV progs about his life, his recipes and his caff/small holding and he set out a challenge competition between himself and the chef at his caff, to serve cauliflower in an exciting way so they could potentially servie it to the customers of the caff. His shows are brilliant because he is always managing to convert people to the love of veg after they vow and declare that they will not, have not and could not possibly ever eat 'x'.
Out of the hearing of the chef, he said to camera that he absolutely loathed Cauliflower cheese since he'd been forced to suffer it at boarding school and that he would never ever serve it at his caff.
Of course the chef chose to make what he called 'Cheesy cauliflower' to serve up to Hugh for his tasting. Hugh was very rude about it till he tasted it, he gave it the thumbs up and agreed to serve it to customers.
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Fresh veggies can be amazing, old, limp, shriveled veggies, not so much.
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wrote:

Can you get 'Fordhook Giant' in the US? This is the variety of silver beet (chard) I've grown for decades.
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songbird wrote:

no
the kind i used to eat

D
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No. White stems - prolly contibutes to why we call it 'silver' beet.
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Farm1 wrote:

I thought 'silver' came from the way water beads on the leaves.
D
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Who knows how it got it's name int he real world. But I have noticed that the stems do have a silvery/pearly look to them.
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songbird wrote: ...

looking at the website for burpee they don't have the same exact "neon lights" mix i picked up the other day, instead they have one with five colors (including white). alas, they do not list the individual variety names.
songbird
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