Ridding My Garden of Foxtail and Oxalis

I spent a huge amout of time ridding my landscape of these two irritants.
I sifted. I tilled. I weeded. I covered. I let the land lay farrow while it cycled through and I repeated like a good shampooing.
I plant my newest purchases of heirloom tomatoes and peppers, water, and watch. Almost like a bad Disney slow-motion movie on plant life, the entire 20' X 20' patch of garden sprouted tufts of oxalis and foxtails.
I realize that oxalis explodes it's seeds into a multi-foot pattern to keep it going and have asked neighbors on the back and side to step up their lawn treatments to contain said pest. Is there a way of completely romoving either of these weeds short of salting the land (to which they are able to overcome, given the evidence in other parts of my yards)?
The Ranger
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Best time to weed is before your weeds emerge. Consider the below URL if your garden can get by by hand.
<http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?scommand=search&search=c oliniar%2bhoe&item93&category)2&subcategoryc2>
Bill PS keep it sharp.
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA

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cuhulain snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.moc says...

The seeds from some plants have an indefinite dormancy period and can linger in the soil for years. I don't know if wood sorrel is one of those but if it is, there's nothing for it but to keep on weeding.
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wrote:

I personally like wood sorrel - the leaves are tasty and the plant pretty but if it's taken over a spot you need for other purposes, I too would weed and within a couple of years of weeding before it goes to seed you'll probably be pleased with the results.
Kate
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wrote:

Wood Sorrel
http://www.pfaf.org/database/plants.php?Oxalis+acetosella
Known Hazards The leaves contain oxalic acid, which gives them their sharp flavour. Perfectly all right in small quantities, the leaves should not be eaten in large amounts since oxalic acid can bind up the body's supply of calcium leading to nutritional deficiency. The quantity of oxalic acid will be reduced if the leaves are cooked. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones or hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet since it can aggravate their condition.
Edible Uses Edible Parts: Flowers; Leaves. Edible Uses: Curdling agent. Leaves - raw or cooked[2, 7, 12, 37]. A delicious lemony flavour, the leaves make a refreshing, thirst-quenching munch and are also added to salads, soups, sauces etc[183]. This leaf should be used in moderation[4, 5, 9, 76], see the notes above on toxicity. Flowers - raw. A decorative addition to salads[K]. The dried plant can be used as a curdling agent for plant milks[66].
Medicinal Uses
Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.
Anodyne; Antiscorbutic; Astringent; Diuretic; Emmenagogue; Expectorant; Febrifuge; Irritant; Stomachic.
The fresh or dried leaves are anodyne, antiscorbutic, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, irritant and stomachic[4, 7, 9, 21]. A decoction is used in the treatment of fevers, both to quench the thirst and allay the fever[4]. Externally, the leaves are crushed and applied locally to dispel boils and abscesses, they also have an astringent affect on wounds[7]. When used internally, some caution is advised due to the oxalic acid content of the leaves[4], the plant is contra-indicated for people suffering from gastritis or a calculus condition[7].
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- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
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MULCH! Before you set out plants, always wet the ground well, lay some cardboard down, wet that too, and cover it with whatever organic stuff you have handy. If you can do this in the fall, it will be lovely by spring, but even if you don't want to wait you can poke holes in the cardboard and set your plants down in there right away. Cover everything with a thick layer of mulch. The weeds will have a really hard time trying to get out.
Planting a low cover crop around the tomatoes can help keep weeds at bay too. Buckwheat grows quickly and smothers weeds. Or sprinkle some basil seeds (or put small seedlings) around the tomato plants--they will help keep weeds down AND give you an herbal accent when you pick the tomatoes.
Weeds cover the ground to protect it. Nature doesn't know the difference between a desirable ground cover and an undesirable one. When the earth is tilled and broken and left naked and vulnerable, weeds step in to cover it to protect it. If you can protect the ground in some other way (by not tilling and using mulch instead, or by planting something more desirable there), the weeds won't be so necessary. --S.
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I got rid off foxtail grass pretty easily by just watching carefully and pulling it early on' and never let it go to a head. Which king of oxalis do you have? The wood sorrel/buttercup type we used to call Sourgrass and nibble on? (I hope it was the plant that gave the sour- ness and not something else) Or do you have the little low creeping one? If its the creeping one I think you will NEVER be rid of it. I am not. Emilie NorCal
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