Re: Harvesting cucumbers

In my haste to find a solution as to the proper time for harvesting cucumbers in my earlier post, I used the word leave instead of leaf! Sorry for that mistake.
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Americans tend to harvest cucumbers too late - they tend to be more tasty and tender when picked at about 4 inches long. Especially if you are _not_ growing one of the usual tough-skinned supermarket varieties.
cheers,
Marj
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I believe cucumbers are ripe when they turn yellow! But most people pick them before then. For pickling I believe around 4" and under are best, for slicing up to around 8" or more depending on variety as long as the seeds aren't filled out. It can be unpleasant to be consuming grown seeds. imho Just try them at all sizes and you will figure which you like. I grew Summer Dance cukes(long Japanese style from Pinetree Garden Seeds) this year and am very pleased with them and will grow them again next year. Would like to try Diva sometime... Grow them vertically for best use of space.

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wrote:

Cukes are nicer young, I think, and can be picked whenever you feel they are large enough.
In my experience, cukes always eventually get some virus disease (or something like that), yellow and then die.
I don't worry about it much - we've always had lots and lots of cukes before they eventually die out all together.
And - in my experience - by the time they die out completely, it's almost time for the first killing frost anyway. (Northeastern USA, various locations.)
I think the easiest way to keep the cukes coming would be to start seeds at different times, and replace the older (diseased) ones with younger vines.
Pat
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Pat Meadows wrote:

I'm going to try spraying mine with compost tea this year.
I've got some compost that is nearly ready, a five gallon pail, mesh bags used for filtering lumps out of paint and will stop off at the pet supply store tomorrow for a small aquarium pump, some airline hose and an aeration stone to keep things aerobic for a few days.
I've been reading that spraying leaves with compost tea will place a barrier between the leaf surface and pathogens.
Over the course of a week last year I lost my beans and cantaloupes to fungal infections. It looked like powdery mildew, but I haven't claimed to know everything about everything since the wedding. ;-)
Worth a try, anyways.
Bill
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On Sun, 03 Aug 2003 22:20:50 -0400, Noydb
Let us know if it works, please.

Bummer. My sympathy.
Pat
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