Late Jalapenos

I started a Jalapeno plant very late in the season. I am just beginning to see flower buds. However, the nighttime temps in Baltimore are beginning to reach between 50 and 60. What are my chances of getting peppers from this plant??? Right now there is no mulch, so I was thinking about laying a black plastic sheet around the plant, hoping to retain some of the daytime heat. Any suggestions?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not very good.

You might try making a plastic cloche, too, as you're going to have to protect it from frost if you're serious about getting peppers. I'm far south of you, in South Carolina, and I've nursed my plants along until mid-December before, but it was a lot of work, and the fruit production dropped off to almost nothing. It's pretty simple to get through the first couple of frosts, or even one hard freeze, but if there are several nights of freezing temperature in a row, the plant is screwed without some sort of heat source.
The temperature is certainly a major part of the equation, but decreasing hours of sunlight and intensity also effect pepper production. It would be much simpler to dig up the pepper, move it inside, and put it under artificial lights.
Interestingly, at least to me, was how different varieties tolerated the cool/cold weather. The Lemon Drops (_C baccatuum_), Chocolate habs, Limon, Pimento De Cheiro ( _C chinense_), and Fish (_C annuum_) held their leaves and maintained marginal pepper production up until the final freeze. The Corno Di Toro, Almapaprika, (C annuum_), Trinidad Seasoning, (_C chinense_), and most of the others starting dropping their leaves as soon as the weather turned cool, and only ripened the peppers they had already produced.
Penelope
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Late Jalapenos ~
The temperature is certainly a major Part of the equation,
But decreasing hours of sunlight And intensity also affect Pepper's Production.
It would be much simpler to dig Up Pepper, move her Inside, and put her under artificial spot lights.
Interestingly, at least to me, Is how different varieties tolerate The cool/cold weather. The Lemon Drops (_C baccatuum_), Chocolate labs, Limon, Pimento De Cheiro ( _C chinense_), And Fish (_C annuum_)
Hold their leaves And maintain marginal pepper production Up until the final freeze.
The Corno Di Toro, Almapaprika, (C annuum_), Trinidad Seasoning, (_C chinense_),
And most of the others start Dropping their leaves as soon as the weather Turns cool, And only ripens the peppers
Already produced." ~ Penelope
~ * Calliope Epic Poetry Clio History Erato Love Poetry Euterpe Music Melpomene Tragedy Polyhymnia Sacred Poetry Terpsichore Dancing Thalia Comedy Urania Astronomy * ~
Deep ~ Sky Objects
~ * T Pyxidi ...
A recurring nova, on 5 occasions, erupted, Reached 6th or 7th magnitude,
First in 1890, Most recently, 1966 * ~
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Since the plant is already in a container, I will be bringing it in. My biggest fear now is keeping it out of reach of my cats.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You can use a LARGE garbage bag for "light freezes", esp. if you secure the bag around the plant, making sure the plant does NOT contact the bag. You want to avoid thermal conduction in this case. If the plants are large, you can try packing loosely crumpled newspaper around the plant (to keep the bag from touching). Also a couple gallons of boiling hot water (in closed containters!) under the bag will help.
Without some way to store heat, you won't be storing much daytime heat for use at night unless you cover the plant with a cloche of some sort..
Good luck!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I admire your ambition. I thought I was the only one who tried to keep plants going as far into the season as possible. I am enjoying a great cherry tomatoe and jalapeno crop now and hopefully for a while longer. I have found that fertilizing and watering will help extend the season a bit. Protection from cold/frost is a must. A little plastic house with a light bulb as a heat source could help. Just like in early spring, but in reverse. Bringing it inside may make the most sense, but then you won't be battling nature, which is half the fun....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.