How do you use your excess bell peppers?

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Of course they like to all mature at the same time. So what should I do with all of them? I like the crunch but I can't eat too many at once because they don't agree with me.
Drying or freezing will naturally lose the crunchiness.
Any good recipes that use a lot of them?
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Make a bell peeper sauce( oil , onions, tomatoes sauce, minced peppers) then preserve for winter. Or preserve them roasted and then under oil. They are not crunchy but good.
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in rec.food.cooking

I guess my question would be how many do you have? I like to dice them and put them in a hot wok with seasoned oil and do a stir fry with them. Of course I add meat and other things to the stir fry. For some reason I really like them with a course grind of black pepper.
Here is a recipe I found a awhile back. This is not a stir fry but you could certainly use a wok. It sounds tempting with a few of my own variations. I have yet to try it but think I'll give it a go as a side dish this weekend. I think I'll serve it with some grilled peppered steak.
Bell pepper rings are fried and seasoned.
INGREDIENTS: 2 pounds green peppers (about 6 medium), cut into 1/4-inch rings 3 tablespoons salad oil 1/2 teaspoon garlic salt 1/2 teaspoon salt PREPARATION: Remove ribs from pepper rings. Heat oil in large skillet. Add pepper rings; cook, over high heat and stirring frequently, until tender-crisp, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with garlic salt and salt. Serve at once. Makes 6 to 8 servings of pepper rings.
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Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:

I agree with Michael; it would be good to know how many you have. Another question to ask would be, do they bother you more if they are raw or cooked?
To use them cooked, I'll make sausage, onions and peppers (that's excellent as a sandwich, too!), fajitas, I'll toss them on a pizza, I'll grill them (they're excellent grilled and wrapped in bacon, too), I'll use them in kabobs....
To use them raw, I'll slice them into wedges and use in place of bread for tuna salad, I'll use in green salads, I'll slice them and coat them with cream cheese, or I'll just slice them and dip them in ranch dressing.
Anyway, I hope this helps!
kili
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On Aug 8, 8:37 am, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
turd

That's pretty much what I do, but I'd specify a decent oil (peanut), and the salt would all come from soy sauce added about a minute or two before plating. I also use a tiny bit of msg if I'm not adding any meat, and either add crushed red chiles just before the soy sauce, or cayenne sprinkled on afterward.
--Bryan
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On Wed, 08 Aug 2007 07:19:49 -0700, James wrote:

Stuffed peppers freeze kinda OK. Otherwise, grill them, skin them, slice them into thirds or quarters and freeze em.
-sw
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I don't grow them, so I don't usually have much in the way of excess bell peppers, but if I do, I dice them and freeze them. They come in handy for lots of things, soups or crab cakes, etc. Omelettes. I actually buy diced green peppers on occasion when vegetables are on sale. Ditto onion.
nancy
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What's a ditto onion?
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They're small and round and you can't tell one from the next.
nancy
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hahabogus wrote:

An onion that divides when you plant an onion set. ;-)
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wrote:

I made the following recipe last weekend and froze the leftovers. I had 6 green bells but it called for reds. I used way more veggies than the recipe called for but only had one can of diced tomatoes. so I used a few tiny cans of tomato sauce. After I applied loads of pepper and a bit of salt I put the pork slices in a big bowl of flour and tossed it before flash frying. I also buttered the noodles and served the noodles, veggies, and meat slightly overlapping each other.
It was a wonderfully simple meal. I froze most of it as there was only two of us eating. When I re-serve I'll do fresh pork but I have not doubt it will be just as good second time around.
Lou
Jagerschnitzel SOURCE: Cooking Light YEAR: June 2000 PAGE: 212
INGREDIENTS FOR 4 SERVINGS: 2 teaspoons vegetable oil 3 cups thinly sliced mushrooms 3 cups coarsely chopped red bell pepper 2 cups coarsely chopped onion 1 cup thinly sliced carrot 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 (14.5-ounce) can diced tomatoes, undrained 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon paprika 2 tablespoons water 1 pound pork tenderloin 1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 1/4 teaspoon salt Cooking spray 3 cups hot cooked yolk-free noodles (about 6 ounces uncooked pasta) Chopped fresh parsley (optional)
INSTRUCTIONS: Pork tenderloin slices are pounded into thin cutlets (or Schnitzel) and served with a vegetable stew in this homage to Alpine hunters.
1. Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, bell pepper, onion, carrot, and garlic; saute 10 minutes. Add tomatoes; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Combine flour, paprika, and water in a small bowl. Stir into tomato mixture; cook 3 minutes or until slightly thick. Keep warm.
2. Trim fat from pork; cut pork crosswise into 16 pieces. Place each piece between 2 sheets of heavy-duty plastic wrap, and flatten each piece to 1/4-inch thickness using a meat mallet or rolling pin. Sprinkle both sides of pork with black pepper and salt. Place a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat until hot. Add pork; cook 4 minutes on each side or until done.
3. Serve vegetable mixture over noodles; top with pork slices. Garnish with parsley, if desired. Yield: 4 servings (serving size: 1-1/4 cups sauce, 3/4 cup noodles, and 4 pork slices).
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION: CALORIES 438 (19% from fat); FAT 9.2g (sat 2g, mono 3.6g, poly 2.7g); PROTEIN 35.2g; CARB 55.4g; FIBER 5.9g; CHOL 79mg; IRON 4.7mg; SODIUM 419mg; CALC 73mg
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"Pandora" wrote:

Is that like big pecker sauce? hehe
Sheldon
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Sheldon wrote:

Lol...and ya know all those Italian blokes *are* uncircumcised.
-- Best Greg
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Gregory Morrow wrote:

I'm sorry for you ;)
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Vilco
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my husband, the gardener, slices all the leftover peppers and throws them in the freezer!

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We freeze them after removing the seeds/core and use them in cooking. Last years crop lasted us almost all winter. Peppers and onions are one of our favorites. We also use them sliced thin on home made pizza.
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Here are two recipes much prized by people who like bell peppers (I am not one of them). The first one is a peperonata recipe from _Cucina Italiana_ compiled by Accademia Italiana della Cucina. (Notice: a 'glass' measure, as defined in the book, is 150-200 ml) Green and red peppers can be used instead of or in addition to yellow ones. The second recipe is from _Trattoria_ by Patricia Wells, complete with her comments.
Peperonata Vegetable stew with peppers
700 g (1.5 pounds) yellow bell peppers 350 g (0.8 pounds) ripe tomatoes 350 g (0.8 pounds) onions 1/2 glass (75-100 ml/2.5-3.4 US oz) vinegar 1/2 glass (75-100 ml/2.5-3.4 US oz) oil salt
Wash the peppers, remove the seeds and membranes, and cut in thin strips. Peel and core the tomatoes. Peel and mince the onions. Put the vegetables in a large casserole with a well-fitted cover. Salt and add the oil. Cover and slowly cook over moderate heat for about 1 hour. The peppers must be just ready by now. Pour in the vinegar and cook everything through for a few minutes longer. As soon as the sauce thickens, transfer the dish to a platter and let cool. The dish can be served cold, warm, or hot.
Oven-Roasted Peppers Peperoni al Forno
Whenever I have a batch of these delicious red and green roasted peppers at hand, I feel secure, as though my larder were somehow complete. These peppers can wear many hats: as a quick lunch with a slice of grilled bread; as a sauce tossed with warm pasta, as a member of a lovely antipasto table. I've sampled these at trattorias all over Italy. Sometimes they are roasted and served as is with just a touch of oil and salt and sometimes they have a nice vinegary tang. Take your choice. Be sure to watch the peppers as they bake: the goal here is peppers that a re soft and fully cooked, with most of the skin still attached. If they scorch, or bake at too high a temperature, the skins fall away and the peppers become unpleasantly dry or rubbery and sometimes bitter. Should you also find yellow or orange peppers in the market, try all four varieties for a festival of colour. Or, if you are partial to red peppers, stick with a single hue. Even those who profess a dislike for peppers will be surprised by the sweetness of this dish.
4 red peppers (about 1 1/2 lb, 750 g) 4 green peppers (about 1 1/2 lb, 750 g) 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Fine sea salt to taste 1 tablespoon best-quality red wine vinegar (optional)
1. Preheat the oven to 350F (180C, gas mark 4)
2. Wash the peppers, quarter them and remove the seeds and membranes. Place in a covered baking dish large enough to hold them comfortably. Toss with the oil and season lightly with salt.
3. Cover and place in the centre of the oven. Bake for 1 to 1 1/2 hours, turning the peppers from time to time so they do not scorch. Remove from the oven and, if desired, toss with the vinegar. Taste for seasoning. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Yield: 8 to 10 servings as an appetizer
Victor
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I dislike bell pepper.
So I use my excess by leaving them at the grocery store.
Or, if eating out, by decorating the edge of the plate with them.
                --Blair
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James wrote:

Peperonata! Sautee some garlic in EVO oil and add bell peppers roughly chopped, some finely chopped onion and a little water to keep it wet for the first 10 minutes of cooking, over medium gas. Add very few tomato sauce, reduce fire to low, cover, salt and let go for about half an hour or so. It makes a nice side dish with almost anything, and someone also uses it to dress cooked plain rice or pasta. You can obviously add some hot peppers to give it more strength. A friend of mine used to make his "pizza ai peperoni" by simply baking a disc of pizza dough and then topping it with peperonata and shredded mozzarella. It can also be served cold but lukewarm is better, and hot smoking is the best.
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Vilco
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I blanch them (after cleaning) and then stuff them with a rice/steamed ground beef/diced tomatoes/herbs & seasoning mix, and top with lots of shredded cheese. I then freeze them in singles, and if they're big peppers and stuffed well, one pepper will make two entrees for me.
N.
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