Can you buy Apple trees to plant that are already producing fruit?

Or do you have to wait 3-5 years after planting them?
I want apple trees on my property but I don't want to wait 3-5 years until they produce fruit.
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Max Jefferson wrote:

I'm pretty sure one can buy almost anything.
Can you wait 2 years? Plant semi-dwarf trees.
Bob
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You may find a mature fruit tree in a nursery, but it may not be your best choice for transplanting either because of it's size or the difficulties with more mature trees. These mature trees do not take well to transplanting, but if you are willing to take the risk, its up to you. Most young trees start out by producing just a handful of fruit, and people will sometimes not allow them to reach any reasonable size to encourage better root growth for future tree health. If you decide to buy a non-bearing fruit tree, keep in mind that a dwarf rootstock will yield fruit a few years sooner than a full size tree. I'm not sure what your hurry is, but I hope it's not part of the trend of instant gratification some people are seeking. Watching a tree grow from a whip is almost like raising a child, as opposed to adopting a full grown kid.
Sherwin Dubren
Max Jefferson wrote:

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wrote:

My neighbor bought a pecan 'tree' a number of years ago that was a 5' switch. The 2nd year we tied an onion bag around its single nut to keep it from the squirrels. Last year we mourned when hurricane Isabel broke one of the many large, heavily-laden branches that shade her back yard.. It doesn't take long.
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Good morning Max.
Almost all the trees I have bought from a nursery come with instructions. In each case the instructions said to pinch off any blooms the first year to allow all the energy to go to the root structure. Good luck in whatever you decide.
Dwayne

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Buy some dwarf or semi dwarf trees and visit the farmer's market for a couple of years while they establish. Large trees don't transplant well, and even if you were to try, it'd take 2 years for them to settle in enough to really get fruit from them, and that's if everything goes right and you don't kill them.
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Buy some property with producing apple trees, bubba. Thanks - C.
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snipped-for-privacy@midsouth.rr.com writes:

As always, it all depends on the situation. When I bought this house, we moved an apple tree which had been planted ten years before as a "twig" and was well established. We pruned it back rather severely, per the tree man's advice. He then hand dug around the roots and balled them in burlap. We then lifted it onto the truck with a small backhoe. We had the hole dug at the new house well ahead of time. The day it was moved, a contractor used the bucket of a track excavator and lovingly lifted it from the truck, over my fence, and set it gently into the hole.
That particular tree had much love and caring surrounding it and responded to it very well. It bore a good crop of fruit the following spring (and every year since) even though nearly everyone told me it would kill it to move it.
This probably wouldn't work with many ten-year established trees, but it did with this one. It is important to me; my son and I planted it when it was a baby; he may be gone but our tree is still with me. It is an official "grandchild" (complete with "birth certificate) of the Old Apple Tree which turned 186 (I think) this year. Each fall, The Old Apple Tree's birthday is celebrated in our community.
In all that plant moving, in addition to rose bushes, we also moved several large lilac bushes and rhodies; the largest rhodie was 12 feet tall. Every one lived and flourished. The secret was a lot of love, good soaking of water before starting, working in the dark of the moon, moving in mid-fall, and careful re-planting and a lot more water. Sometimes, it seems the plants know how much they are loved. Sadly, sometimes they die anyway, but these did not.
And this for the woman who could kill any house plant that came her way!!!
Glenna

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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com (Max Jefferson) wrote in message

You should wait a lot longer than that, if you want a healthy apple tree. Even if you found something to produce apples soon after planting, the number of fruits it would produce would be small. Growing trees is not for the impatient, and growing trees that produce food is really not for the impatient. This is not the land of Oz. If you're in a hurry, buy from a local orchard (or plant some strawberries).
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