www.screwfix.com outside tap kit Quote 10101


Hi
the kit comes with a cutter that i guess goes over the pipe and as it tightens cuts a hole. what happens to the bit it cuts out? i am worried about it falling in to the pipe and flowing towards the combi boiler.
looks easier than fitting a T joint with compression joints.
this will be my first time doing any plumbing.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Last time I did this for a washing machine, the bit of pipe came out of the tap. I had left the next tap running when cutting the pipe to make sure the bit came out with the water.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
As a plumbing inspector for a local water company (so pretty experienced) these kits are rubbish and more trouble than they are worth. Use a compression tee and do it properly, its well worth it in the end to avoid problems.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I tried one of these kits and found the water pressure was reduced so much that I only had a trickle coming out of a 60 ft hose. Trying to use it with a sprinkler was a waste of time. It would also take an age to fill a watering can direct from the tap. The cutter on these kits will usually be 1/4 inch diameter so effectively you're throttling the flow from 1/2 inch diameter down to 1/4 inch diameter, which is a reduction of 1:4 in the section area. In the end I had to replace the kit with a standard "T" piece, thereby maintaining normal pressure.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
I would sling that and use a compression T. As others have said there are issues with pressure loss and the punched out bit going astray. I've also heard that there can be problems with them leaking.
A compression T couldn't be much easier anyway, if you can tighten a nut and bolt you can do it. You will almost certainly have to put other joints in anyway, so one more won't hurt. Does the kit also include a shut-off or isolator of some kind? I would want to be able to turn it off in winter and drain down the outside part to avoid freezing.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and
and
Hi All
the kit includes a shutoff in the piece that cuts and provides the feed to the pipe that runs to the tap. only bit that worries me about a T is cuttng the pipe where do the copper filings go, i assume a junior hack saw is the tool to use so there must be some and last thing i want is to damage the new boiler intake with filings.
so the plan now is a T followed by a cut off , then the piping to the external tap.
i guess its best to T in after the T that splits to the boiler & cold water taps with the new T on the cold water taps side of the boiler T.
stopcock --T ------ NEWT ----- cold water taps & cistern -----> | | shutoff valve shutoff valve | | boiler outside tap (with reverse flow block thingy)
I hope the above looks ok when posted.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you're worried about hacksaw filings, can you use one of those cutters that you twist around the pipe gradually tightening, They slice rather than saw and should create no filings.
--
Keith Willcocks
(If you can't laugh at life, it ain't worth living!)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

to
are
also
in
filings.
water
thingy)
Yep that looks good to me. As Keith said, a pipeslice is really the tool for the job, but may be expensive if this is to be its only use. A pipe cutter of the type where you tighten it up as you turn will be cheaper and has the advantage of being able to cut different sizes of pipe, but the disadvantage of needing more room to use it, or you have to remove the pipe to cut it. Swings and roundabouts. Alternatively, if you can smear grease round the pipe where you are cutting it to catch the swarf *and* hold it with the cut at the bottom, you can use the hacksaw and avoid the swarf getting into the system. There may even be a filter in the system somewhere, I don't know. Looking at your diagram, if you could remove the pipe from the existing T before cutting, that would do it, is that a compression T or a soldered one? Anyway, one of these should do you.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

it
in
nut
or
winter
<snip>
for
the
disadvantage
cut
the
one?
pipe slice 22mm 15, pipe cutter 149 , i think a slice is the option as i only have a limited amount of plumbing to do. Mole Grips to turn it?
i could remove the first T as it is compression fitted.
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
SNIP

What's that, a solid gold one?
Screwfix's item 21946 pipe cutter 3mm - 28mm is the one for you, especially at 3.49. You only need fingers to turn it, tighten the adjuster a bit at a time as you rotate it round the pipe. If you do decide to go for the pipeslice, be sure you get the right one. Your pipe is probably 15mm not 22mm.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

especially
a
the website says 149.99! but if your order its 14.99 item 74696
Yep 3.49 works for me :) , not checked the pipe dia yet, wonder if homebase sell these bits & bob's
Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes they do, the pipe cutter is the best option. I've done loads of DIY plumbing and it's a far better bet than a hacksaw. Only issue is if your pipe is right up against the wall which may cause a working room problem. However, you can usually be pretty brutal with copper systems and put quite alot of force into them without a problem. Not something that can be easily done with dodgy push fit plastic rubbish everyone seems so keen on these days!
Al
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.