Wooden Double Glazing


Hi
Our 1910 house is in need of some new windows, but we're reluctant to use PVC-U. Has anyone got any experience of getting wooden d/g installed - in particular, quality and cost.
We thought we'd start with the flat windows before moving on to the bays. This is going to cost a packet isn't it?!
I was thinking of trying some local (Midlands) joinery companies, but I'd appreciate any suggestions.
TIA
Steve
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We used to have wooden double glazing but every single window suffered from condensation and we changed the lot to UVPC. I suspect the frames flexed with humidity/temperature changes and opened the seals between the panes.
John Fox

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Wooden DG is fine and probably much more in keeping with your older house - all down to the quality of the starting product.
The actual glazing itself is probably the same whether its in wood or plastic frames.
You will have to look after the wood, though; i.e. varnish every 4/5 years.
G.
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Gil wrote:

Don't forget they do wood effect PVC. I woudls get that. Painting windows is a pain, and for the outside very expensive
--
zaax

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wrote:

Definitely go with wood as it will help preserve value. I have recently had softwood windows made, the timber was pressure treated first, protimized (actually a vacuum process) The sealed units are the same as for any other type of window and comprise 4mm outer glass pane, 12 or 16mm spacers bars, 4mm inner glass pane. The glass is bonded to the perimeter spacer bars and argon gas injected, the whole perimeter is then wrapped with silver foil. The glass is Pilkington soft K glass which has special coatings to reflect the heat back into the house. If you have intermediate bars in your windows then have the sealed units made up to the overall casement size, then have what are called interbars set into the space between the glass panes. Your timber windows are then made up with false divider bars on the outside and inside. When all is assembled the window will look as elegant as the original windows with nice slim bars. It's an illusion but it really works. The sealed units are fitted into the rebates with butyl tape, and the best place to buy is online from Reddiseals. I have got my windows divided into 6 panes in each casement so I went for Pilkington Actif self cleaning glass on the outside, It added 200 to the price for 24 sealed units which is not bad given the intended benefits of not paying window cleaners. It also has a very slight blue reflection when viewed from outside which is very attractive.
Paint the frames before you put them in if poss, don't forget to put plenty of undrcoat on the head and sides to keep out damp. Paint the sashed before they are glazed as it's a doddle. The sealed units can then be put in while the sashes are on the bench, it's a lot easier than trying to glaze in situ, you just need 2 peple, one to hold the units (heavy) and one to pop the screws into the hinges which should be pre-fitted to the frames. Black butyl tape with bronze spacers looks great. The interior wood of th ewindows can be either finished with Danish oil or water based matt varnish eg Focus Do it All version as it's dead quick and doen';t darken the timber. Upvc windows in old properties are nasty and can also be expensive. Go for a joiner who is recommended, I used a one man business but he is south of Bristol
This forum link is interesting re timber windows www.greenbuildingforum.co.uk/forum/index2.php?DATEIN=tpc_kqqbsvpkv_1153817782
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