Which way?


I am refitting an En-Suite for a neighbour, as previously stated. They are re using the 'old' sink as it has a larger than average bowl (and they like it). The sink is going back in the same place as previously. My problem is that the sink was not sat on the pedestal before (1/2" gap) and they want it supported when I reinstall it. The wall is a dot and dabbed PB onto blockwork. If I position the sink on the pedestal then the new holes for the plugs will no doubt break int the existing holes. How can I get around this? I was thinking of using car body filler but how can I ensure it fills the holes left by the plugs, which I can remove. Can you 'inject' car body filler if so what with as I can see it making a right mess using a poly bag ala icing bag!
Cheers
John
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John wrote:

What about lifting the base of the pedestal by 1/2" on a 1/2" thick piece of plywood on the floor. Paint to match the pedestal or to match the floor.
Owain
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John wrote:

Oh, just whack it in with an old trowel and when it goes 'rubbery' carve off the surplus with a kitchen knife and black sand it back and then use polyfilla to make it all good.
In fact why not just use bonding plaster? Its stronger than plasterboard anyway.

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Thanks for the answer but that still doesn't help me to ensure the filler fills the hole left by the plug. As the PB is dot and dabbed to blockwork there is a 1/2" gap between the back of the PB and the face of the blockwork. "just whack it in with an old trowel..." whilst filling the hole in the PB does not guarantee filling the hole left by the plug (in the blockwork).
Cheers
John
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Could you evade the problem by using the original holes to secure offset plates that the sink-fixers screw/bolt into?
Maybe something as simple as 20mm thick blocks of hardwood, or thick plates of metal/plastic with fixing bolts pointing forwards.
--
Tony Williams.

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Tony Williams wrote:

Maybe something even simpler like plugging and screwing them.
Use extra long screws and remove them after the new holes have been drilled and plugged or use dome heads and leave them in where the new holes will follow alongside.
A bathroom aught to have patresses for such equipment, failing that, lots and lots of plasterboard adhesive to do the same job.
Unfortunately there is a tendency for these things to go in at a price or for untrained and poorly informed labour to do the job. More than likely both.
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John wrote:

Oh., I see. Said the blind man..
Well rip out enough of the plasterboard so you can get at the blockwork. And fill it..probably with mortar to be honest.
Make it all good with plaster.
No point in keyhole surgery.

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Drill the existing hole to a suitable size and knock in a wooden dowel with lots of No more nails/ pink stuff.
Leave to harden overnight
This will stop the new hole braking into the old one.
-
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The word 'Cowboy' seems to come to the fore in this thread. Joe

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Well im sure everyone is just holding their breath waiting to hear what you would do.
especially from a top posting Pillock
--





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