Using higher power G9 bulb than recommended


I have a couple of wall lights that are 'sealed' bathroom type lights and use G9 capsule bulbs. The highest recommended bulb power is 25 watts which is somewhat dim!
Is the heat given off by a 40 watt G9 bulb likely to be considerably higher and likely to cause problems? The glass shades on the wall lights (which are not actually being used in the bathroom but as reading lights over a bed) are cylindrical and a bit like inverted bottles, they have a diameter of about an inch and a half. I wonder if I cut the tops off the glass shades and allowed ventilation to get in and around the bulb whether that would allow for the use of a higher power bulb?
The units can be seen here:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
Uno-Hoo!
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Uno-Hoo! wrote:

If you can remove the tops and provide air inlets at the bottom, the odds are that the fitting and shade temperatures will actually /decrease/.
However, this is still not using the fitting iaw the manufacturer's recommendations. If a serious fire did result, say as a result of a fault within the fitting and nothing to do with your modification, you run the risk that the insurance company may decline or be reluctant to pay - if the modifications and higher than recommended lamp wattage were discovered during the investigation.
I would suggest measuring the shade temperature before and after modification and with and without a higher wattage bulb. That will also give you the peace of mind of knowing that anyone touching the shade will not get a serious burn as a result.
--

Sue














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