Re: Freezer question, your experience.

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Simple. Evacuate the air from the room. Place freezer on scale, take reading. Open freezer door, let air out. Take another reading. Subtract second from first.
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wrote:

You'd need a gravity scale. lol
Actually you lose it all... if your upright freezer is a 10 cuft model within 2 seconds of opening the door ALL 10 cuft of cold air drops out like it was a lead balloon (minus however much cuft your food occupies).
With a chest freezer in still ambiant air practically zero cuft of air drops out, even if there is no door. Most stupidmarket food freezers/fridges are chest type and have no door... instead they have a fill line and many have add-on deflectors to block air agitation. Food stores are more and more moving away from upright freezer/fridge units.
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So what?
Assume the freezer is half full (5 cu ft food, 5 cu ft air). Five cubic feet of food weighs about 250 pounds. Five cubic feet of air weighs about seven ounces.
Do you *really* believe that replacing seven ounces of zero-degree air with seven ounces of room temperature air is going to make *any* noticeable difference in the temperature of two hundred fifty pounds of food???
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2010 08:53:10 -0400, brooklyn1 wrote:

All the freezers and fridges in the isles (100-150 feet long x 4 rows), milk/dairy, and beer (about 80% of the store) are clearly the upright variety (doors and no doors). The only exceptions are the chests in front of the meat displays.
-sw
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Good thing they have windows so you can see what is inside before you use a sawzall to gain entry.
I prefer freezers with doors wether it is an upright or chest. Makes gaining entry so much easier than the sealed types.
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On Thu, 3 Jun 2010 20:55:14 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

it's somewhere between an r.c.h. and a metric buttload.
your pal, blake
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Doug Miller wrote:

My ATV tires take 3 psi yet they don't collapse! Read up on atmospheric pressure.
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It's 3PSI above atmospheric presure, dumbass.
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AZ Nomad wrote:

At sea level, moron?
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You can't possibly be that stupid. It's an act, right?
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2010 20:38:51 -0500, AZ Nomad wrote:

Sorry Larry. I don't know you if anybody asks.
-sw
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wrote:

Tire pressure gauges measure the difference between the pressure inside the tire and the pressure outside the tire.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pounds_per_square_inch
Note in particular this sentence: "Psi is often used incorrectly instead of psig."
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wrote:

You're the one that needs to do the reading. Pressure gauges do *not* measure absolute pressure. Google the difference between psig and psia.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 19:17:29 -0400, Larry wrote:

Yeah - What Larry said! You tell em Larry!
-sw
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wrote:

Larry has no clue about this; obviously, neither do you. I'll give you the same advice I gave him: *you* read up on atmospheric pressure. Learn the difference between psig and psia.
Here, I'll help: http://lmgtfy.com/?q=atmospheric+pressure
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 10:48:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Either way, I'm not overly concerned about cold air escaping - doesn't seem to have any significant real-world effect...
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-snip-

I suspect I've lost more $ with the chest freezers I've owned through lost food than I have through the 'air dump' of the uprights. [minimized by keeping the freezer full- even if it is just jugs of ice or bread.]

My neighbor wasn't that big-- but a few minutes with my electric chainsaw & he fit in my upright just fine.<g>

I've owned both & prefer the upright for most use. If I was buying a whole cow every year I might consider a dedicated 'beef freezer'.
Jim
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wrote:

That is true, a lot of stuff tends to stay buried at the bottom - if you're not vigilant.

You chopped up your freezer with a chainsaw?!? :p

Yeah, I'm going for an upright next time, but keeping the old chest freezer for emergencies... or for the larger neighbours.
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On Thu, 03 Jun 2010 13:19:56 +1000, Jeus wrote:

Take out the shelves and stand them upright.
Ever try and stuff a rigor mortis'ed body into a chest freezer?
-sw
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Just wait until it comes out of rigor, of course.
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